[MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

"There are some who call me...Tim!" Discuss Magic: The Gathering campaign setting, as it relates to pen & paper RPGs, here
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Big Mac
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[MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by Big Mac » Sat Jul 08, 2017 11:11 am

I've played Magic: the Gathering, in the past, and taken a passing interest in how the universe worked, but didn't really think I'd ever be using it in a tabletop game, as WotC seemed to have no interest in turning it into a Dungeons & Dragons campaign setting.

I got a bit more interested, when I saw the Skyship Weatherlight content, as I thought that could possibly be Spelljammerised. :twisted:

But, it's been the recent Plane Shift: Zendikar, Plane Shift: Innistrad and Plane Shift: Amonkhet that have made me realise there was actually enough background to run some sort of world-hopping D&D game in the M:tG universe.

But then Canageek said that Starship Weatherlight came from thousands of years ago in Dominaria's past (in my Starship Weatherlight topic).

Now I'm wondering why there is a big timejump between the period of the Starship Weatherlight novels and the Plane Shift D&D conversions.

How many time periods (and time jumps) have there been in Magic: the Gathering lore? (Does this match up with anything like "editions" of Magic cards?)

How many worlds have been included in each time period or edition?

What sort of mechanisms have been used to add each world?

What sort of mechanisms have been used to hand wave each time jump/edition change?

What (if anything) has WotC done to handwave worlds that have been dropped from new M:tG card editions? (Do they just leave fans waiting to see if worlds will come back, like with D&D settings? Or have their been any backstories that have closed down access to any of the worlds?)

Is there anywhere with a good timeline or list of worlds that helps explain the basic concepts of this to newbies?
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Re: [MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by Big Mac » Sat Jul 08, 2017 1:04 pm

I found, what looks like, a very good timeline on MTG Wiki. :cool:

I also found a Plane article and a category called Category:Planes that give some information (a bit too much for me right now) about planes.

EDIT: The Multiverse article at MTG Wiki is more helpful. It has a table at the bottom

Planes of the Multiverse
Magic Story Settings|Dominaria • Rabiah • Ulgrotha • Serra's Realm • Phyrexia • Rath • Shandalar • Mercadia • Mirrodin • Kamigawa • Ravnica • Lorwyn–Shadowmoor • Alara • Zendikar • New Phyrexia • Innistrad • Fiora • Theros ([i]Arkhos[/i]) • Tarkir ([i]Mongseng[/i]) • Regatha • Vryn • Kaladesh • Amonkhet • Ixalan Featured in Planechase|Azgol • Belenon • Equilor • Ergamon • Fabacin • Iquatana • Ir • Kaldheim • Karsus • Kephalai • Kinshala • Kolbahan • Kyneth • Luvion • Meditation Plane • Moag • Muraganda • Pyrulea • Segovia • Valla • Wildfire • Xerex Other Planes|Alkabah • Aranzhur • Azoria • Cabralin • Cridhe • Diraden • Echoir • Gastal • Ilcae • Metal Island • Nether Void • Vatraquaz
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Re: [MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by AxesnOrcs » Sat Jul 08, 2017 7:12 pm

Mongseng and Tarkir are similar but different planes. Tarkir got created because it's copyrightable. There is a weird time-travel thing that happens there too. A dragon-fanatic planeswalker travels back in time 1000 years to alter history so that dragons end up still existing on Tarkir during the "present."

The Mending, which is a thing that is a thing that was done so Planeswalkers could be used as game cards by making them just mana-users that can also planeswalk, happened.

The big time shifts between some blocks and the current story shows shifts in the ways WotC has tried out to do their stories.

Also, WotC's Intro to the game from the lore side page: http://magic.wizards.com/en/new-to-magic/lore
You can also ask around on Twitter and Tumblr for Vorthoses, the folks that are really invested in the lore of MtG.
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Re: [MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by Tim Baker » Sun Jul 09, 2017 12:18 am

Big Mac wrote:But, it's been the recent Plane Shift: Zendikar, Plane Shift: Innistrad and Plane Shift: Amonkhet that have made me realise there was actually enough background to run some sort of world-hopping D&D game in the M:tG universe.
I didn't find a Piazza thread for it, but wanted to mention Plane Shift: Kaladesh is another setting that WotC did a D&D conversion for.

MODERATOR NOTE: DIscussion of Homelands split off into separate topic called: [MtG][Ulgrotha] Homelands as inspiration for tabletop games
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Re: [MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by willpell » Sun Jul 09, 2017 7:33 pm

AxesnOrcs wrote:Mongseng and Tarkir are similar but different planes. Tarkir got created because it's copyrightable.
Mongseng isn't?
Boddynock wrote:A favorite of mine when talking about turning something into a table-top setting is based off the card set: Homelands
Of all the settings MTG has even visited, Homelands is probably the least interesting IMO. I do like a few of the characters, but the backdrop they exist against seems to be intentionally underwhelming for my taste. Parts of Dominaria are more boring, but Dominaria is a huge world; Ulgrotha pretty explicitly isn't.
Grandmother Sengir (an ancient vampire who possess a dangerous artifact known as the Apocalypse Chime)
To the best of my recollection, Grandmother is not a vampire (though it's conceivable that the Baron turned her at some point). I've seen a comic book which documented how, I believe, she was originally a planeswalker (which, pre-mending, meant she was already immortal), rang the Apocalypse Chime to destroy most of the plane, and was driven mad with grief. Sengir keeps her around for his amusement, but turning her was likely unnecessary (again, pre-mending at least).
Ihsan's Shade (the shade of a Paladin who either serves the Baron or is just a powerful, but cursed undead. His art looks very Deathknight-like).
I think the Baron has a ring or something that enables him to control Ihsan, or at least banish him. Ihsan tried to destroy the Baron, and still hates him, but is unable to do much of anything because of his insubstantial nature.

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Re: [MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by Canageek » Sun Jul 09, 2017 9:28 pm

Early on in Magic there were a number of informal groups each writing their own stuff. Richard Garfield did the original set, on Dominaria, and a second plane with an Arabian Nights theme. Another group did a couple of planes after that, and one of Garfield's D&D groups did the Homelands setting.

Basic plot recap, as I remember it. Spoilers of course.

On Dominaria there is a race called the Thran. They use mana through the use of artifacts and have a very technological feel. A group of them are exiled to another plane and become the Phrexians. This is before any sets have come out.

Fast forward a few thousand years. Two brothers are training to be archaeologists and inventors and are digging up Thran relics. Magic is not widely known, mana is treated as a technological power source. Eventually one of the brothers (Mishra) comes across a portal to the plane the Phrexians were exiled to, opens it, and is corrupted by it them. He and his brother (Urza) war, eventually becoming dictators that control the world, and strip mine and devastate almost the whole thing.
The war ends with a climatic battle over a newly discovered resource-rich island. Mishra dies, and Phrexians show up to attack the exhausted armies and begin and invasion. Urza detonates a magical nuke he found, absorbing much of the mana unleashed and becoming a planeswalker. I belive this also blows up the gate they planned on using, and This is shown peicemail in several early sets (Basic-4th edition, Antiquities, possibly some others)

The next set in the timeline The Dark is set in the following decades as the climate cools due to the nuclear winter effect. Fallen Empires is set in a continent far to the north that was untouched by the war, but all the empires there are being devastated by the climate change. The Dwarves being overrun by Orcs and Goblins, the Merfolk by a race of lobster people who's birthrate skyrockets due to the cooling oceans, the Elves fungus-creatures they created as a food source due to the shorter growing season, the Order of the Ebon Hand by the Thrulls, creatures they bred for warfare, and the Icatian Empire by a combination of internal strife and Goblin and Orc attack. This is my favourite setting.

Then there is another small time gap one or two hundred years, and the world has cooled into an Ice Age. Sets deal with the the various Ice Age nations, and the plans of an evil necromancer.

Due to the magical blast Dominaria and the nearby planes are cut off from the rest of the multiverse. Urza goes crazy for a while, works on revenge on the Phrexians, eventually becomes sane again and his efforts become more focused. The seal around Dominaria eventually lifts, and the Phrexians find out about his plans and there is a shadow war against them. Urza gets into time travel and it goes badly, then he focuses on building a series of artifacts and breeding clone armies and heroic bloodlines to oppose the phrexians. This goes on for a long time. Thousands of years. I don't know this plotline very well, I only read one or two of the books in it. Anyway, Urza teams up with other planeswalkers, visits various planes, and the Weatherlight is created. It travels around, so we get lots of sets following it, and the planes it visits. Rath and Mercadia (A city plane, as I recall). The Weatherlight discovers the PHrexians planes, which is to create an artifical plane (Rath), then overlay it onto Dominaria, so the armies of Phrexia can just march out and invade everything. They aren't able to stop this, but Urza and his allies defeat Phrexia and its planewalker leader, but at great cost.

Next set is hundreds of years later, and is kind of a story reboot. Dominaria is now more of a fantasy Mad Max type setting. Cults, barbarian tribes and people summoning their literal nightmares are some of the factions.

This is where I left following Magic lore for a few decades. Events that occur in here include aftermath from all the giant overpowered magic from the Phrexian invasion and other planeswalking and time travel events. This is creating rifts that are threatening existence, leading to The Mending, which cuts the power of planeswalkers and takes away their immortality.

I picked up a few years ago, right about the start of the current storyline about The Gatewatch. A small band of planewalkers that form to stop the invasion of creatures that live between the planes and appear to eat planes. They were trapped under a certain plane, but eventually got out. Two of them are fought and defeated on Zendicar, leaving the plane in ruins, but healing. The last is lured to another plane, Innistrad, a gothic horror type plane, where more planeswalkers join in to trap it in the moon.

Lately the plots have involved the Gatewatch tangling with the oldest known planeswalker, a Dragon, who seems to be close to getting his pre-mending powers back. This has taken them over Kaladesh (Artifact and city themed, very high-society), and Amonket (Ancient Egypt, plus mummies as servents and evil gods).

So, it used to be a lot of there characters were immortal planeswalkers, so they could toss down a hundred years to separate sets, to explain why there were new nations, changed uniforms, and so on. I suspect there will be less of that now that everyone is mortal and would age if they did that, and instead there is a bigger focus on planer travel, instead of moving around to different times and places on Dominaria.

(Also, I've gotten my girlfriend, Mara to apply for membership to the board. She'll help clarify this once she is approved for membership.)

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Re: [MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by AxesnOrcs » Mon Jul 10, 2017 2:19 am

willpell wrote:
AxesnOrcs wrote:Mongseng and Tarkir are similar but different planes. Tarkir got created because it's copyrightable.
Mongseng isn't?
No, neither Mongseng nor Arkhos became the planes that they inspired, Tarkir and Theros. Those planes are separate and in the case of Mongseng and Arkhos, unlikely to ever get anything aside from the Planechase cards that reference them made.
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Re: [MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by willpell » Mon Jul 10, 2017 5:24 pm

Canageek wrote:I don't know this plotline very well, I only read one or two of the books in it.
I have read just about all of the books related to Urza, except for the prequel "The Thran" (which describes Yawgmoth's rise to power and thus is not especially necessary to understand the story of how he was defeated).

* The Brother's War is by Jeff Grubb, and is hands-down the best MTG novel ever published. It's not just a good tie-in book; it's a good fantasy book, and possibly even just "a good book". Cannot recommend it enough.
* Planeswalker by Lynn Abbey is a close second. It is largely told from the perspective of Xantcha, a Phyrexian sleeper agent (basically a Terminator) whom Urza rescued after she is "scrapped" for being "defective" because she has actual human empathy, rather than just being a cold-blooded infiltrator. He takes her planeswalking with her and she's essentially a Doctor Who companion to him as he continues his somewhat deranged plans.
* Time Streams is a different author who I don't remember. It's less good, but does at least have one really compelling scene in it which I remember, where a Phyrexian skyship is being crashed into the ground of Serra's Realm as it's collapsing (Serra's is a world where slabs of ground float in a perpetually cloudy and sunlit sky, although spatial distortions make each chunk of earth seem infinite to those who are standing on it; only Serra's angel servitors can perceive their status as flying "islands"). I may or may not have this book, as I dropped my original copy in the rain a decade ago, and don't recall whether I ever got it replaced.
* Bloodlines is the final book in the Urza's Saga tetralogy (Brother's War corresponds loosely to the Antiquities set, though it was published some five years after the fact; the rest of the series was contemporaneous with the corresponding card sets). I don't recall a single solitary thing about it.
* Invasion, Planeshift, and Apocalypse each has a book of the same name, which tell the story of how the Phyrexian invasion of Dominaria goes down, and has a B-plot where Urza leads a group of planeswalkers into Phyrexia to destroy it. The story is radically different in detail from the card set, since they were being run by different teams; one particularly neat plot point somewhere in the trilogy, which I would have killed to have cards related to, involves the nature-spirit Gaea transforming a group of the flesh-and-metal Phyrexians into similarly-shaped creatures of solid, living wood, which causes them to fight on her side. The Urza side of the story reveals exactly how deeply twisted he is, and without giving spoilers, that's really all I can say (beyond the fact that we know the mission succeeded in the end, or else the storyline would be over, for Dominaria at least).
Next set is hundreds of years later, and is kind of a story reboot. Dominaria is now more of a fantasy Mad Max type setting. Cults, barbarian tribes and people summoning their literal nightmares are some of the factions.
I haven't read the Odyssey trilogy, which details these events, but I have read the Onslaught trilogy, which follows directly after. It is absolutely batshit insane, with some of the dumbest plot points I've ever seen in any work of fiction, but also some very thought-provoking and weird ideas that I would have loved to see in the card game. Among these, there are godlike beings for the colors Red and Black, where the black one manifests as a room full of gold gathered through lucrative criminal activities, where the mass of coins rises up and speaks in a voice of sliding and tinkling metal; the red one is carved into mountain rock in the form of gigantic mystical glyphs, which transform into golem-like humanoids and peel themselves away from the rock to carry out their master's instructions. If I'm making the book sound cool and making you want to read it, well, I reiterate: it is also extremely, extremely stupid in places.

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Re: [MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by DialMforMara » Tue Jul 11, 2017 8:44 pm

Girlfriend here.
Canageek wrote:
...and the Weatherlight is created. It travels around, so we get lots of sets following it, and the planes it visits. Rath and Mercadia (A city plane, as I recall).
Mercadia only has one city on it, which is also called Mercadia and sits at the top of an upside-down mountain. Most of the aristocrats there are goblins, and I'm pretty sure that's because they're secretly working for Volrath, a shapeshifter who's planning the Phyrexian invasion.

Outside the city there are several other groups of people: the Cho-Arrim, who live in a vast forest; the Saprazzans, who are merfolk; and the druids who guard the ruins left when the god Ramos brought everyone to Mercadia. Ramos turns out to be one of Urza's robot dragons, who brought the Mercadians' ancestors here from Dominaria to escape the end of the Brothers' War. The crew of the Weatherlight have to find the pieces of Ramos to fix the Weatherlight so they can go home.

Important note: the collection of artifacts and bloodlines Urza created is called the Legacy. It includes the Weatherlight itself, a flying ship that can planeswalk; Karn the silver golem; and Gerrard, the ship's first mate, who's the last remaining member of any of Urza's bloodlines. Volrath is Gerrard's jealous adopted brother who turned evil and joined Phyrexia.
Canageek wrote:...The Mending, which cuts the power of planeswalkers and takes away their immortality.
A number of current Planeswalker characters were around before the Mending, and are suitably frustrated by the loss of their power. These include:
  • Liliana Vess, a necromancer from Dominaria, who has made deals with demons to get her eternal youth back and is now killing all of them so she doesn't have to pay up
  • Sorin Markov, a vampire from Innistrad, best known for helping to seal the Eldrazi within Zendikar and for creating Avacyn, the guardian angel of Innistrad whose job it is to make sure the vampires will always have humans to eat (instead of letting them kill them all at once)
  • Nahiri, a kor lithomancer from Zendikar, who helped Sorin seal away the Eldrazi and resents that it had to be on her home plane
  • Ugin, a "spirit dragon," who also helped seal away the Eldrazi
  • Nicol Bolas, an ancient Elder Dragon, sole known survivor of the Elder Dragon War, and the current Big Bad of Magic. He has come up with all kinds of dark schemes to get his power back.
Canageek wrote:
I picked up a few years ago, right about the start of the current storyline about The Gatewatch. A small band of planewalkers that form to stop the invasion of creatures that live between the planes and appear to eat planes. They were trapped under a certain plane, but eventually got out.
Yeah, the Eldrazi (the local giant eldritch horrors) get let out, because Nicol Bolas manipulated other Planeswalkers into doing it for Reasons. The original Gatewatch include:
  • Gideon Jura, a hieromancer and battle mage from Theros, who led the Zendikari military campaign against the Eldrazi. Has serious regrets.
  • Jace Beleren, a mind mage who's erased his own memory so many times he can't remember where he's from (but we know it's called Vryn and has been at war for a long time). Dated Liliana until she tried to get him killed.
  • Chandra Nalaar, a pyromancer from Kaladesh, where fire magic is illegal. Holds herself responsible for her parents' deaths (her mother is alive, and her father's death was someone else's fault). Tried being a monk in a pyromancers' abbey, but couldn't sit by and watch once she knew Jace and Gideon needed her help.
  • Nissa Revane, an elvish animist from Zendikar. Can summon the soul of the plane as an elemental. Learning to not be racist.
Liliana joins the Gatewatch later so that she can use them as backup for killing her remaining demons. Ajani Goldmane, a leonin (lion person) from the Naya shard of the plane of Alara, has also joined.

Side note: Alara is one of the blocks both Canageek and I missed. It's about a plane split into five shards that are about to smash back together, and Nicol Bolas sets things up so he can profit from the magical energy and political chaos caused by that smashing. Ajani partly stops him. There's also an important plane called Ravnica,
which I can talk about if anyone would like my underinformed opinion. It's where the Gatewatch are headquartered.

Canageek wrote: Two of them are fought and defeated on Zendicar, leaving the plane in ruins, but healing. The last is lured to another plane, Innistrad, a gothic horror type plane, where more planeswalkers join in to trap it in the moon.
Nahiri was so angry at Sorin for not helping her control the Eldrazi better that she went a little crazy and lured Emrakul to Innistrad to mess up Sorin's home like she felt he'd messed up hers. This starts with Avacyn going mad and killing people, and ends with Emrakul transforming half the plane into Eldrazi spawn.

With the Eldrazi gone (though Emrakul's exile to Innistrad's moon appears self-imposed, so she's not gone for good), the role of the Gatewatch has shifted to being a sort of general Justice League (Jacetice League?) for the multiverse. In this capacity, they go to Kaladesh to provide security for an Inventor's Fair, only to discover that the government is corrupt and the trouble is being caused by Chandra's mother and her band of renegade inventors. They also find Tezzeret, one of Bolas' agents from Alara, there looking for the ultimate magical artifact, a portal that can send things between planes. We now have a hint about why Bolas would need such a thing; I'll get to that in a minute. Chandra works out her family issues, and Nissa starts to become more open to learning about new things.
Canageek wrote:Lately the plots have involved the Gatewatch tangling with the oldest known planeswalker, a Dragon, who seems to be close to getting his pre-mending powers back. This has taken them over Kaladesh (Artifact and city themed, very high-society), and Amonket (Ancient Egypt, plus mummies as servents and evil gods).
From Kaladesh our heroes have gone to Amonkhet, an Ancient-Egypt-like plane that has been corrupted by Nicol Bolas. Everybody's happy there and the gods walk among the people (to Gideon's delight, since he's been trying to find himself, or maybe run from himself, ever since a bad experience with the Therosian god of the dead, and the Amonkhetu god of solidarity is kind of able to help). Of course, the gods are a lie, because Bolas was able to change even their memories. The trials are a lie, because their goal is to build up an undead army for Bolas (this may be why he needs the planar portal). And the afterlife is a lie, involving not a glorious paradise but instead, in the set that comes out this weekend, the three missing Amonkhetu gods, who have been transformed into agents of destruction. And Bolas has just shown up and is guaranteed to kick the Gatewatch's collective butt. Kind of a downer, unless you're among those Magic players who'd gotten a little sick of the Gatewatch after eight consecutive sets about them. (I'm not. I want Nissa and Chandra to flirt more, and Jace and Liliana to just, ugh, get over each other already.)

So that's where we stand now. The next two sets are on a plane called Ixalan, which has Mesoamerican influences as well as PIRATES AND DINOSAURS, and then we're going back to Dominaria to celebrate Magic's 25th anniversary.

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Re: [MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by Havard » Sun Jul 22, 2018 6:43 pm

We can soon add Ravnica to the list of MTG Planes available in RPG form:

Dominaria | - | Discussion
Kaladesh | PDF | combining with Al Quadim
Zendikar | PDF | discussion of combining Zendikar with Planescape), Piazza Discussion of Zendikar
Amonkhet | PDF |
Innistrad | PDF |
Ixalan | PDF |Piazza Discussion of Ixalan and Maztica
Ravnica | Hardcover | Discussion

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Re: [MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by Dread Delgath » Mon Jul 23, 2018 1:54 am

I've been always on the outskirts of M:tG since 1994 when I bought my first batch of cards.

A few months ago, I sold my entire collection of M:tG cards which numbered into the thousands. Its okay, most of them were worthless commons & uncommons, as I tend to have very poor luck getting any good cards through boosters and the normal FLGS transactions, and I never bought very many useful rare or very rare cards from the internet, since I always lagged behind my friends who were forever & still on their phones researching M:tG cards & decks. I got $150 USD for it. :roll:

I have about 15-20 M:tG novels from between 2002 - 2009. I never once read any of them. They're still in a dusty old box in storage.

There were cards & characters from M:tG that I really, really, really liked and wanted to see D&D versions of them someday. Now that I've sold all my cards, I have to guess at the names of some of them, but I remember a few of them like Phage, Braids, Akroma, Jeska & her brother Kamahl. Thankfully there is a M:tG wiki that I can look them up & get the barest details that I can use as NPC histories for my current D&D campaign, and the same thing goes for the beasts & other creatures that I can no longer remember. :cool:

I'm looking forward to the Ravnica PDF anyway.
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Re: [MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by willpell » Fri Jul 27, 2018 10:53 pm

Dread Delgath wrote:
Mon Jul 23, 2018 1:54 am
I have about 15-20 M:tG novels from between 2002 - 2009. I never once read any of them. They're still in a dusty old box in storage.
If you ever get them out, start by reading "The Brothers' War" by Jeff Grubb. It's by far the best.

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Re: [MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by Big Mac » Tue Aug 07, 2018 12:07 pm

Tim Baker wrote:
Sun Jul 09, 2017 12:18 am
Big Mac wrote:But, it's been the recent Plane Shift: Zendikar, Plane Shift: Innistrad and Plane Shift: Amonkhet that have made me realise there was actually enough background to run some sort of world-hopping D&D game in the M:tG universe.
I didn't find a Piazza thread for it, but wanted to mention Plane Shift: Kaladesh is another setting that WotC did a D&D conversion for.
There wasn't one. But there is a topic for it now: [MtG][Kaladesh] Plane Shift: Kaladesh (D&D/MtG crossover).
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Re: [MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by Big Mac » Tue Aug 07, 2018 12:08 pm

AxesnOrcs wrote:
Sat Jul 08, 2017 7:12 pm
Mongseng and Tarkir are similar but different planes. Tarkir got created because it's copyrightable. There is a weird time-travel thing that happens there too. A dragon-fanatic planeswalker travels back in time 1000 years to alter history so that dragons end up still existing on Tarkir during the "present."

The Mending, which is a thing that is a thing that was done so Planeswalkers could be used as game cards by making them just mana-users that can also planeswalk, happened.
Thanks. That sounds similar to the mass elven magic that Elane Cunningham put into Evermeet: Island of the Elves. They sacrificed themselves to move other elves off of a doomed planet (and onto Toril).
AxesnOrcs wrote:
Sat Jul 08, 2017 7:12 pm
The big time shifts between some blocks and the current story shows shifts in the ways WotC has tried out to do their stories.

Also, WotC's Intro to the game from the lore side page: http://magic.wizards.com/en/new-to-magic/lore
Ah.
AxesnOrcs wrote:
Sat Jul 08, 2017 7:12 pm
You can also ask around on Twitter and Tumblr for Vorthoses, the folks that are really invested in the lore of MtG.
Is that the nickname for the hard-core M:tG fans? :?
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Re: [MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by willpell » Wed Aug 08, 2018 5:46 pm

Big Mac wrote:
Tue Aug 07, 2018 12:08 pm
AxesnOrcs wrote:
Sat Jul 08, 2017 7:12 pm
You can also ask around on Twitter and Tumblr for Vorthoses, the folks that are really invested in the lore of MtG.
Is that the nickname for the hard-core M:tG fans? :?
It refers to people who are very deep into the story and setting and such of MTG, without necessarily being interested in the cards.

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Re: [MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by Big Mac » Fri Aug 10, 2018 1:31 am

willpell wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 5:46 pm
Big Mac wrote:
Tue Aug 07, 2018 12:08 pm
AxesnOrcs wrote:
Sat Jul 08, 2017 7:12 pm
You can also ask around on Twitter and Tumblr for Vorthoses, the folks that are really invested in the lore of MtG.
Is that the nickname for the hard-core M:tG fans? :?
It refers to people who are very deep into the story and setting and such of MTG, without necessarily being interested in the cards.
That would be us then, seeing as this is a D&D forum. :lol:
David "Big Mac" Shepheard
Please join The Piazza's Facebook group, The Piazza's Facebook page and The Piazza's Google + community and follow The Piazza's Twitter feed so that you can stay in touch.
Spelljammer 3E Conversion Project - Spelljammer Wiki - The Spelljammer Image Group.
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Re: [MtG] How does the Magic: the Gathering universe work?

Post by AxesnOrcs » Tue Aug 21, 2018 4:51 am

Big Mac wrote:
Tue Aug 07, 2018 12:08 pm
AxesnOrcs wrote:
Sat Jul 08, 2017 7:12 pm
Mongseng and Tarkir are similar but different planes. Tarkir got created because it's copyrightable. There is a weird time-travel thing that happens there too. A dragon-fanatic planeswalker travels back in time 1000 years to alter history so that dragons end up still existing on Tarkir during the "present."

The Mending, which is a thing that is a thing that was done so Planeswalkers could be used as game cards by making them just mana-users that can also planeswalk, happened.
Thanks. That sounds similar to the mass elven magic that Elane Cunningham put into Evermeet: Island of the Elves. They sacrificed themselves to move other elves off of a doomed planet (and onto Toril).
AxesnOrcs wrote:
Sat Jul 08, 2017 7:12 pm
The big time shifts between some blocks and the current story shows shifts in the ways WotC has tried out to do their stories.

Also, WotC's Intro to the game from the lore side page: http://magic.wizards.com/en/new-to-magic/lore
Ah.
AxesnOrcs wrote:
Sat Jul 08, 2017 7:12 pm
You can also ask around on Twitter and Tumblr for Vorthoses, the folks that are really invested in the lore of MtG.
Is that the nickname for the hard-core M:tG fans? :?
It the segment of the fanbase that care about the lore.
https://axesnorcs.blogspot.com/ Semi-frequent posts on RPGs, focused on stuff I make for games I run.

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