Kaidan a Japanese Horror dark fantasy setting (PFRPG)

A place where the monk class won't feel like an oddball. Kara-Tur can be discussed in the FR sub-forum. Rokugan, Mahasarpa and other oriental worlds can be discussed here.
The Book-House: Find Oriental Adventures products.

Re: Kaidan a Japanese Horror dark fantasy setting (PFRPG)

Postby Big Mac » Sun Apr 10, 2016 7:07 pm

Michael Tumey wrote:I just did the mockup layout for Chapters 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 of GMs Guide to Kaidan (out of the proposed 9 chapters of the total guide), so we can get art orders done. Jonathan McAnulty is tying up loose ends on his part (he wrote the mentioned chapters). We've picked a couple other authors to write the missing chapters, and we've picked two new artists to do the art orders. Steven Russell of Rite Publishing is managing all the back end work. So it is being done, and will be released sometime soon, but I don't have an exact date of release. I'm really more the setting developer, art order decider and page layout guy, at this point - so I'm not "in the know" as much as I'd like to be. It is coming. There are other products and maybe a full adventure path that I'd like to do for Kaidan, but the GM's guide has to come out first.


Is there any progress on this book yet?
David "Big Mac" Shepheard
Newsflash!: The Piazza is moving!
Please join The Piazza's Facebook group, The Piazza's Facebook page and The Piazza's Google + community so that you can stay in touch.
Spelljammer 3E Conversion Project - Spelljammer Wiki - The Spelljammer Image Group.
Moderator of the Spelljammer forum. My moderator voice is green.
User avatar
Big Mac
Giant Space Hamster
 
Posts: 21594
Joined: Sun Jun 15, 2008 3:52 pm
Location: London UK

Re: Kaidan a Japanese Horror dark fantasy setting (PFRPG)

Postby sam » Thu Nov 24, 2016 11:03 am

Ashtagon wrote:I don't think this was a mistake. The key is in the fact that "wu jen" was never a Japanese word. It's Chinese (巫人), specifically Wade-Giles romanisation. I don't know whether or not it is a valid representation of Chinese arcane magic traditions, but it's unreasonable to judge it on whether or not it was a reasonable representation of Japanese tradition.

Oriental Adventures (both 1e and 3e) were very syncretic books in terms of culture sources, spanning as far west as India and as far east as Japan. And reaching from Mongolia to Malaysia. It is unsurprising that some aspects weren't Japanese in context.



When my friends and I translated "wu jen" into Chinese,we will call them "巫觋"--"巫" refers to the magic users to help others solve the disaster, "见" means to let others see,"觋" means:the magic users walking the streets to help others.The difference between "巫" and "觋" is that the "巫" is in a fixed position, "觋" to go out. "觋" on the surface meaning is regardless of men and women, but the ancient people think that men go out is more convenient, therefore, "觋" is also defined as male. I think "wu jen" is the mixed impression of the oriental casters.
sam
Hobgoblin
 
Posts: 55
Joined: Thu Aug 20, 2015 8:04 am

Re: Kaidan a Japanese Horror dark fantasy setting (PFRPG)

Postby Ashtagon » Thu Nov 24, 2016 1:07 pm

Are you saying this as a native speaker of Chinese? Because it doesn't match my understanding.

見 (见 in PRC) is a component of 覡 (觋 in PRC). Specifically, it is what's known as a radical. In this specific case, the radical is the concept of seeing (so the overall hanzi approximates the English-language conept of "seer"). There's nothing in either of the hanzi or their radicals which implies walking or streets.

Additionally, the pronunciation of that hanzi does not match "jen" as written in Oriental Adventures.

As it happens, both 巫觋 and 巫人 are real Chinese words. It would take someone rather more fluent than myself to clarify the difference in nuance between them though. But given the readings of those hanzi, 巫觋 certainly is not where the OA writers got the word "wu jen" from. There is nothing in any of the hanzi involved that suggests either gender, although woman have a long history of involvement in East Asian mystic traditions.

巫觋 (pinyin: wū xí; Wade-Giles: wu hsih)
巫人 (pinyin: wū rén; Wade-Giles: wu jên)
Emma Rome, otherwise known as Ashtagon
Image
Overall site admin for The Piazza. My moderator colour is pink!
User avatar
Ashtagon
Hierarch
 
Posts: 3465
Joined: Thu May 22, 2008 5:45 pm
Location: Hillvale, Isle of Dawn

Re: Kaidan a Japanese Horror dark fantasy setting (PFRPG)

Postby sam » Thu Nov 24, 2016 4:26 pm

Ashtagon wrote:Are you saying this as a native speaker of Chinese? Because it doesn't match my understanding.

見 (见 in PRC) is a component of 覡 (觋 in PRC). Specifically, it is what's known as a radical. In this specific case, the radical is the concept of seeing (so the overall hanzi approximates the English-language conept of "seer"). There's nothing in either of the hanzi or their radicals which implies walking or streets.

Additionally, the pronunciation of that hanzi does not match "jen" as written in Oriental Adventures.

As it happens, both 巫觋 and 巫人 are real Chinese words. It would take someone rather more fluent than myself to clarify the difference in nuance between them though. But given the readings of those hanzi, 巫觋 certainly is not where the OA writers got the word "wu jen" from. There is nothing in any of the hanzi involved that suggests either gender, although woman have a long history of involvement in East Asian mystic traditions.

巫觋 (pinyin: wū xí; Wade-Giles: wu hsih)
巫人 (pinyin: wū rén; Wade-Giles: wu jên)


"巫人" is also right,but ah...I try to explain:)
Our basic concept is that 巫觋 is a general term. 见 in 觋 is an extension of the meaning,"can be seen in the streets ";Oracle Bone of 巫 expressed: When worship, hand-held clever tools, wishing the coming of gods. 巫 also has this meaning, from 说文解字: 巫,祝也。女能事无形,以舞降神者也。象人两褎舞形。 Translation: 巫, who prayed to gods. Women can serve the invisible things, can use the dance makes the gods come. (Glyph of 巫) like a person waving two sleeves. There are also exist: 在女,曰巫;在男,曰觋。On female, is 巫; On male, is 觋. 巫觋 has a wide meaning, can point to all men and women to exercise the mysterious arts(Especially to communicate with spirits/gods).We feel that the use of this word will be more image. Of course, I may have mistranslated parts, I am not particularly knowledgeable :(
sam
Hobgoblin
 
Posts: 55
Joined: Thu Aug 20, 2015 8:04 am

Re: Kaidan a Japanese Horror dark fantasy setting (PFRPG)

Postby sam » Fri Nov 25, 2016 4:20 pm

On the other hand, the scope of "巫人" point to is too complicated. Of course, this word can point to the "mysterious", it can also point to people whose family name is "巫", it can also point to Malays. In contrast, the scope of "巫觋" point to is more focused on the "ancient mystery", although this word sometimes as a derogatory, refers to the liar. So, when we translate it into Chinese, we should also consider these points.:)
sam
Hobgoblin
 
Posts: 55
Joined: Thu Aug 20, 2015 8:04 am

Re: Kaidan a Japanese Horror dark fantasy setting (PFRPG)

Postby Ashtagon » Sat Nov 26, 2016 12:04 am

I don't get the whole "translate into Chinese" bit. It already *is* Chinese, isn't it?
Emma Rome, otherwise known as Ashtagon
Image
Overall site admin for The Piazza. My moderator colour is pink!
User avatar
Ashtagon
Hierarch
 
Posts: 3465
Joined: Thu May 22, 2008 5:45 pm
Location: Hillvale, Isle of Dawn

Re: Kaidan a Japanese Horror dark fantasy setting (PFRPG)

Postby sam » Sat Nov 26, 2016 2:02 am

Ashtagon wrote:I don't get the whole "translate into Chinese" bit. It already *is* Chinese, isn't it?



Yeah, but this is not "Chinese language of easier to understand for modern Chinese people". You directly say "wu jen" is not many people understand.And when we transform it into “hàn zì” form, we will have more consideration.
sam
Hobgoblin
 
Posts: 55
Joined: Thu Aug 20, 2015 8:04 am

Previous

Return to Oriental Adventures

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest