[Realmspace] Arcane Age Anadia

"Let us create vessels and sails adjusted to the heavenly aether, and there will be plenty of people unafraid of the empty wastes." — Kepler
The Book-House: Find Spelljammer products.

Moderators: Big Mac, night_druid

Post Reply
User avatar
Big Mac
Giant Space Hamster
Posts: 25241
Joined: Sun Jun 15, 2008 3:52 pm
Gender: male
Location: London UK
Contact:

[Realmspace] Arcane Age Anadia

Post by Big Mac » Sat May 04, 2019 9:45 am

Sometimes, I go to talk to someone about something and a bizarre unrelated idea pops into my head.

posted a topic in the Spelljammer forum, called History of Lizardfolk and other races and posted this at the end of my reply:
Big Mac wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 8:33 am
Coronoides wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 4:40 am
Are there other races that are very different from their earth-bound cousins? If so what do we know about the history of these races?
The Hadozee are connected to the Shadowpeople of Krynn. Shadowpeople are black in colour and live in caves. I suppose you could build a history where the two races were originally a single race.

The Yaggol of Dragonlance are devolved Mind Flayers. You don't even need to create fanon for that. It's on the 2e monster sheet.

The Taladas trilogy of novels has them switching to worship of one of the local Dragonlance deities and living in pyramids. It seems like they sacrifice the local natives to placate the deity they serve. (This might still involve them eating the brains of their victims. I'm not 100 percent sure on the details.)

I think you would possibly be better off starting other topics for other races (or looking to see if there are existing topics) so that you can concentrate on building up the lizardfolk in this topic. For example, there are other worlds in Realmspace and you could blend the SJ background and FR background in different ways to help tell a story of how Realmspace used to have lizardman spacefaring ports on most worlds. :-)

(For example an Arcane Age era version of Anadia covered in jungles could be fun. Imagine a neogi invasion, where they carry out slave raids on villages and farms and slowly destroy the environment, while also capturing the lizardman ships that take off to seek help from other worlds. The end point would need to be the planet being "destroyed" and ending up with the lizardmen loosing the world and the neogi abandoning their umberhulks and leaving the planet...with the halflings taking over what is left.)
So, now I'm wondering about that last paragraph, and how Anadia might have been in the distant past.

We know that the umberhulks were abandoned by the neogi at some point.

We know that the Anadian halflings took control of both poles.

Could there have been a time in the past when Anadia was slightly more habitable away from it's poles?

Could people have lived under the ground to avoid the midday heat?

Could a rain forest have made the equatorial regions habitable, or would there always have been some desert to cross to get from the northern hemisphere to the southern hemisphere?

What would be the best time period for a historical campaign set on Anadia? Would the rise of the halflings and the period when the neogi were trying to take over the world have happened in the same era?
David "Big Mac" Shepheard
Please join The Piazza's Facebook group, The Piazza's Facebook page and follow The Piazza's Twitter feed so that you can stay in touch.
Spelljammer 3E Conversion Project - Spelljammer Wiki - The Spelljammer Image Group.
Moderator of the Spelljammer forum (and administrator). My moderator voice is green.

User avatar
Big Mac
Giant Space Hamster
Posts: 25241
Joined: Sun Jun 15, 2008 3:52 pm
Gender: male
Location: London UK
Contact:

Re: Arcane Age Anadia

Post by Big Mac » Sat May 04, 2019 10:20 am

This NASA article might be useful, in an attempt to retcon the past of Anadia: NASA Climate Modeling Suggests Venus May Have Been Habitable:
NASA wrote:Venus may have had a shallow liquid-water ocean and habitable surface temperatures for up to 2 billion years of its early history, according to computer modeling of the planet’s ancient climate by scientists at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York.

The findings, published this week in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, were obtained with a model similar to the type used to predict future climate change on Earth.

“Many of the same tools we use to model climate change on Earth can be adapted to study climates on other planets, both past and present,” said Michael Way, a researcher at GISS and the paper’s lead author. “These results show ancient Venus may have been a very different place than it is today.”

Venus today is a hellish world. It has a crushing carbon dioxide atmosphere 90 times as thick as Earth’s. There is almost no water vapor. Temperatures reach 864 degrees Fahrenheit (462 degrees Celsius) at its surface.

Scientists long have theorized that Venus formed out of ingredients similar to Earth’s, but followed a different evolutionary path. Measurements by NASA’s Pioneer mission to Venus in the 1980s first suggested Venus originally may have had an ocean. However, Venus is closer to the sun than Earth and receives far more sunlight. As a result, the planet’s early ocean evaporated, water-vapor molecules were broken apart by ultraviolet radiation, and hydrogen escaped to space. With no water left on the surface, carbon dioxide built up in the atmosphere, leading to a so-called runaway greenhouse effect that created present conditions.

Previous studies have shown that how fast a planet spins on its axis affects whether it has a habitable climate. A day on Venus is 117 Earth days. Until recently, it was assumed that a thick atmosphere like that of modern Venus was required for the planet to have today’s slow rotation rate. However, newer research has shown that a thin atmosphere like that of modern Earth could have produced the same result. That means an ancient Venus with an Earth-like atmosphere could have had the same rotation rate it has today.

Another factor that impacts a planet’s climate is topography. The GISS team postulated ancient Venus had more dry land overall than Earth, especially in the tropics. That limits the amount of water evaporated from the oceans and, as a result, the greenhouse effect by water vapor. This type of surface appears ideal for making a planet habitable; there seems to have been enough water to support abundant life, with sufficient land to reduce the planet’s sensitivity to changes from incoming sunlight.

Way and his GISS colleagues simulated conditions of a hypothetical early Venus with an atmosphere similar to Earth’s, a day as long as Venus’ current day, and a shallow ocean consistent with early data from the Pioneer spacecraft. The researchers added information about Venus’ topography from radar measurements taken by NASA’s Magellan mission in the 1990s, and filled the lowlands with water, leaving the highlands exposed as Venusian continents. The study also factored in an ancient sun that was up to 30 percent dimmer. Even so, ancient Venus still received about 40 percent more sunlight than Earth does today.

“In the GISS model’s simulation, Venus’ slow spin exposes its dayside to the sun for almost two months at a time,” co-author and fellow GISS scientist Anthony Del Genio said. “This warms the surface and produces rain that creates a thick layer of clouds, which acts like an umbrella to shield the surface from much of the solar heating. The result is mean climate temperatures that are actually a few degrees cooler than Earth’s today.”

The research was done as part of NASA’s Planetary Science Astrobiology program through the Nexus for Exoplanet System Science (NExSS) program, which seeks to accelerate the search for life on planets orbiting other stars, or exoplanets, by combining insights from the fields of astrophysics, planetary science, heliophysics, and Earth science. The findings have direct implications for future NASA missions, such as the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite and James Webb Space Telescope, which will try to detect possible habitable planets and characterize their atmospheres.
That's obviously real-world science, which does not apply to Spelljammer, but the stuff about dry land helping to prevent a greenhouse effect is something I had not thought of.

Clouds that shield the surface from sunlight are also a good idea (that could be bumped up for a fantasy world). I'll have to look to see if the Faerûnian Pantheon or the Halfling Pantheon has a deity of clouds.
David "Big Mac" Shepheard
Please join The Piazza's Facebook group, The Piazza's Facebook page and follow The Piazza's Twitter feed so that you can stay in touch.
Spelljammer 3E Conversion Project - Spelljammer Wiki - The Spelljammer Image Group.
Moderator of the Spelljammer forum (and administrator). My moderator voice is green.

User avatar
Seethyr
Couatl
Posts: 1404
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2010 1:07 am
Gender: male
Location: The City of Gold

Re: [Realmspace] Arcane Age Anadia

Post by Seethyr » Sun May 05, 2019 3:42 pm

I don’t know what it is about Anadia that makes it my favorite of all the SJ worlds outside of the “main” campaign worlds. I am strongly considering one day working out many more details and an “arcane age” history would certainly be part of this.

I can imagine for one, that given their tendency to always seek ecological balance, the anadjin were one of jungle Anadia’s main races. Perhaps they were predominantly jungle druids, and something Dark Sunny happened leading to the current circumstances. The anadjin have “devolved” but maintain plenty of their old tendencies.

Perhaps it was the neogi that caused this disaster? I don’t know SJ lore well enough, but do the neogi have a canonical homeworld? Because this could be it. They stole much of the life force from jungle Anadia to create their artifact level helms and ships before they set off for Wildspace. They took their umber hulk allies with them, leaving the feral ones behind and the anadjin were left to pick up the pieces.

If I were to write up a history about this, the halflings would be latecomers. I think Anadia would be better served having no true humanoid (elf, dwarf, human, AND halflings) races to begin with because it developed as a world independent from otherworldly influences.

I know none of that is canon, but I’d love to see Anadia as it’s own campaign world. Dark Sun light in a way.

Edit: Any thoughts on what role the plainsjan have in all this? I’ve always thought of them as rejects from the Fae planes, but specific details elude me. Maybe they were summoned by the anadjin in a last ditch effort to stop the neogi destruction?
Follow the Maztica (Aztez/Maya) and Anchorome (Indigenous North America) Campaigns on DMsGuild!

The Maztica Campaign
The Anchorome Campaign

User avatar
Angel Tarragon
Dawn Dragon
Posts: 8992
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2010 2:39 am
Gender: female
Location: Valley of the Sun, AZ
Contact:

Re: [Realmspace] Arcane Age Anadia

Post by Angel Tarragon » Mon May 13, 2019 10:45 am

Seethyr wrote:
Sun May 05, 2019 3:42 pm
Perhaps it was the neogi that caused this disaster? I don’t know SJ lore well enough, but do the neogi have a canonical homeworld? Because this could be it. They stole much of the life force from jungle Anadia to create their artifact level helms and ships before they set off for Wildspace. They took their umber hulk allies with them, leaving the feral ones behind and the anadjin were left to pick up the pieces.
This could be an interesting tidbit to extrapolate per the origin of lifejammers.
Social Media & Extended Signature

Pathfinder 2E
The ABCs of Character Creation
Product Catalog

Post Reply

Return to “Spelljammer”