Dungeon #80

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Dungeon #80

Post by ripvanwormer » Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:55 am

The AD&D adventure "Fortune Favors the Dead" in Dungeon #80 is set in "the swashbuckling kingdom of Guadalante, land of romance and derring-do, home of swordsmen, poets, and rogues." Could be good for Almarron or Vilaverde in particular.

For the adventure to work as written, you need an ocean (the Sea of Dread), a coast (the Savage Coast), some badlands (such as Terra Vermelha or Sierra del Plata, or really any wastelands area; it doesn't have to be near where the PCs land), and a magic cup associated with a martyred saint ("Pholtus" should probably be replaced with Ixion, Tarastria, or Vanya, and Santiago should probably an Ispan heretic in Thyatis 500 years ago). The characters begin in the Known World and, following a treasure map, set sail along the coast to find their fortune.

For whatever reason the adventure seems to assume Oerth as the default world, but I think it'd work a lot better with Mystara considering Mystara has a land similar to Guadalante and Oerth, canonically, doesn't.

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Post by Eric Anondson » Mon Feb 04, 2013 1:15 am

ripvanwormer wrote:For whatever reason the adventure seems to assume Oerth as the default world, but I think it'd work a lot better with Mystara considering Mystara has a land similar to Guadalante and Oerth, canonically, doesn't.
Not only does Mystara have a land similar, Mystara has a land CALLED Guadalante!
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Re: Savage Coast Product List & Downloads

Post by ripvanwormer » Mon Feb 04, 2013 2:56 am

So it does! I thought it felt like a Savage Coast adventure. Strangely, though, the adventure doesn't seem like it would work in Mystara's Guadalante at all. There's no desert there, or a coast. The maps look nothing alike. It would work better in Cimarron.

Perhaps the author just included the name Guadalante as a hint or shout-out to Savage Coast fans.

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Re: Savage Coast Product List & Downloads

Post by Havard » Mon Feb 04, 2013 11:50 am

Interesting!

Do you know who wrote the adventure Rip?

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Re: Savage Coast Product List & Downloads

Post by ripvanwormer » Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:11 pm

Havard wrote:Interesting!

Do you know who wrote the adventure Rip?

-Havard
Lance Hawvermale, who also contributed to a series in Polyhedron on Greyhawk's deities, an article on the Rhennee for the Living Greyhawk Journal, and an adventure for Necromancer Games.

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Re: Savage Coast Product List & Downloads

Post by Havard » Mon Feb 04, 2013 4:16 pm

How odd!

Image


This map fits very poorly with the Savage Coast indeed. Perhaps the adventure was originally written for the Savage Coast line, but then they had the maps changed at a later date when the Red Steel/Savage Coast line was cancelled? Something similar happened with the Den of Dragons boxed set.

Edit: now if you flip the map around a bit, you could get it to look like the coastline around Cimmaron County, as outlined on this map by Thorf.

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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by Seer of Yhog » Mon Feb 04, 2013 4:41 pm

Ciudad Morillos...hmmm, there is a Puerto Morillos in the Savage Coast, in Narvaez. Maybe it is a shout-out. If the author wrote something for Necromancer Games then he's still active and could be contacted.
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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by Havard » Wed Feb 06, 2013 4:48 pm

Great idea Seer!

Facebook can be a pain at times, but it also has its advantages!

Got in touch with Lance Hawvermale who wrote the adventure. He seems like a really nice guy and got right back to me. He asked me to pass along the following message:
Good afternoon, and thanks for the message! "Fortune Favors the Dead" was my second professional publication and helped me get into the writing business, so I will always cherish it. Trivia: the NPC depicted on the magazine's cover, Tonja, was named after my girlfriend at the time. The direct inspiration for the adventure was the Emilio Estevez western, "Dollar For the Dead," which in turn was inspired by the spaghetti westerns of Clint Eastwood; basically I wanted to write a D&D western. But if you see echoes of "The Savage Coast" in there, it's probably not coincidence. When I first started playing D&D in the early 80s, I owned only the PHB, DMG, and two modules: "When A Star Falls" and "X9: The Savage Coast," by Merle and Jackie Rasmussen. I'd love to hear about your experience in playing the adventure!

inspired by the spaghetti westerns of Clint Eastwood; basically I wanted to write a D&D western. But if you see echoes of "The Savage Coast" in there, it's probably not coincidence. When I first started playing D&D in the early 80s, I owned only the PHB, DMG, and two modules: "When A Star Falls" and "X9: The Savage Coast," by Merle and Jackie Rasmussen. I'd love to hear about your experience in playing the adventure!
I also gave him the link to this thread, so he may be paying us a visit later on :) :)

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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by Havard » Mon Feb 11, 2013 8:37 pm

Image

Here's the cover art for Dungeon #80, apparently linked to the adventure "Fortune Favors the Dead".

Good Savage Coast art? :)


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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by Lance Hawvermale » Tue Feb 12, 2013 1:48 am

Hello, all!

It's so cool to see this adventure being discussed. It's one of my favorites. As Havard mentioned, one of the first modules I owned was The Savage Coast, so it's always had a fond spot in my heart. However, other than the Red Steel boxed set (which included an audio CD, if I recall), I have little experience with that campaign world. The setting for "Fortune Favors the Dead" was never meant to be anything but a standalone environment (as dictated by the magazine editors), though certain place and NPC names might be allusions to some of my favorite things. The most obvious example is the image that Havard posted. The artwork is by Mark Zug, and it's titled Tonja and the Raiders. Tonja was my sweetheart at the time (do people still say "sweetheart"?). I had the pleasure of seeing the original painting at GenCon, but alas, I couldn't afford the hefty pricetag. :D

The adventure is certainly a tip of the hat to classic westerns, and the torn map is a well-worn plot device but one I couldn't resist. My group and I built a full campaign around the setting, including specialized character classes such as the matador and goucho.

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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by Big Mac » Wed Feb 13, 2013 2:08 am

Lance Hawvermale wrote:Hello, all!
Hello Lance! Welcome to The Piazza! :mrgreen:
Lance Hawvermale wrote:It's so cool to see this adventure being discussed. It's one of my favorites. As Havard mentioned, one of the first modules I owned was The Savage Coast, so it's always had a fond spot in my heart. However, other than the Red Steel boxed set (which included an audio CD, if I recall), I have little experience with that campaign world. The setting for "Fortune Favors the Dead" was never meant to be anything but a standalone environment (as dictated by the magazine editors), though certain place and NPC names might be allusions to some of my favorite things.
I saw a list of RPGs that you have worked on, on your website. Are any of those connected to your Serobi Wastes campaign setting? Or is this the only time you ever wrote anything commercial for the setting?
Lance Hawvermale wrote:The most obvious example is the image that Havard posted. The artwork is by Mark Zug, and it's titled Tonja and the Raiders. Tonja was my sweetheart at the time (do people still say "sweetheart"?). I had the pleasure of seeing the original painting at GenCon, but alas, I couldn't afford the hefty pricetag. :D
Some D&D art is very expensive. If my favourite picture (a Spelljammer picture called "Last Descent") ever comes onto the market, I might be asking myself if I can get away with selling one kidney, so that I can buy it. :lol:

Out of interest, did Mark Zug actually use your Tonja as the Tonja in the painting or is it only her name that got used?
Lance Hawvermale wrote:The adventure is certainly a tip of the hat to classic westerns, and the torn map is a well-worn plot device but one I couldn't resist. My group and I built a full campaign around the setting, including specialized character classes such as the matador and goucho.
That home campaign sounds interesting. The painting Havard posted shows Tonja and one of the raiders using crossbows (instead of rifles). Did you translate the western-theme into fantasy weapons, or did you make guns and gunpowder more available?

I remember, long after seeing the Magnificent Seven, finding out it was based on the Seven Samarai and watching that film. What stood out to me, when I compared the two versions of the same story, was that the use of guns in the western version pushed a lot of the combat out to ranged combat, while the original Japanese film had a lot of melee combat, with a few moments of gun combat (when one of the heroes stole a gun from the enemy). One thing that strikes me, from a roleplaying point of view, is that more modern games tend to have weapon ranges that are beyond talking distances (unless you put people in a maze of buildings, so that the walk around corners and are suddenly right up close to other people). I've not done cowboy RPGs, but I have done some science fiction LARP and that felt very different.

Anyhoo, what I'm asking is, did you find that your home campaign of Serobi Wastes turned into something that had a very different "feel" to fantasy D&D? Or did you manage to add western themes, without making the pace of the game radically different from a fantasy world with medieval themes?

I already asked if any of your commercial work was connected to Serobi Wastes, but do you have any unpublished documentation from your home campaign? Did you ever do anything like make an expanded map, write up descriptions of locations on your world or write any adventures for the setting? If you did, do you still have that stuff* or did it get lost?

* = A while ago, I found out about the sketch map that Sean K. Reynolds made for his Ghostwalk campaign setting and it was very interesting to compare it to the published map. I also found out that he had run a Ghostwalk adventure for some friends, but spoke to him about it and found out that he had lost the adventure when he had a computer crash. I don't know if this sort of stuff counts as "homebrew" or "fanon" until/unless it is published, but this sort of "designer's home campaign" material is something I think is very interesting to read about.
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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by Havard » Thu Feb 14, 2013 9:10 pm

Hi Lance,
great seeing you here! :)

Lance Hawvermale wrote:The adventure is certainly a tip of the hat to classic westerns, and the torn map is a well-worn plot device but one I couldn't resist. My group and I built a full campaign around the setting, including specialized character classes such as the matador and goucho.
Any chance of you posting those classes? A Matador Class sounds like it would be a lot of fun!

I am toying with the idea of changing the map so that the adventure can be used with the Savage Coast.

And yeah, any suggestions for stats for Tonja in case I want to use her as an NPC? :)

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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by Lance Hawvermale » Fri Feb 15, 2013 3:24 am

Thanks for these awesome questions.
Big Mac wrote: I saw a list of RPGs that you have worked on, on your website. Are any of those connected to your Serobi Wastes campaign setting? Or is this the only time you ever wrote anything commercial for the setting?
I was never really sure about the wisdom of trying to publish any more material that used place and people names from "Fortune Favors the Dead," because WotC owned all of that after they paid me for the adventure. It was no longer mine. In a similar vein, my first module with Necromancer Games, What Evil Lurks, was actually written for a contest sponsored by Polyhedron, but then 3E came along, and the contest was cancelled. So I had to change out anything that sounded remotely like a tip-of-the-hat to Greyhawk, the Savage Coast, Dragonlance, et cetera. It's funny how these things work out sometimes.
Big Mac wrote: Out of interest, did Mark Zug actually use your Tonja as the Tonja in the painting or is it only her name that got used?
He asked me for a physical description, but he wasn't working from a photograph. The one thing he nailed: She's cooler than I am, both in real life and in that painting.
Big Mac wrote: The painting Havard posted shows Tonja and one of the raiders using crossbows (instead of rifles). Did you translate the western-theme into fantasy weapons, or did you make guns and gunpowder more available?
Dungeon didn't want any firearms in the adventure, though I proposed them. In the adventure, Tonja has a wand strapped to her crossbow, so I could capture the visual effect of using a rifle while sticking to the magazine's mandates.
Big Mac wrote: Anyhoo, what I'm asking is, did you find that your home campaign of Serobi Wastes turned into something that had a very different "feel" to fantasy D&D? Or did you manage to add western themes, without making the pace of the game radically different from a fantasy world with medieval themes?
The biggest difference became the themes that grew naturally from our adventures there. As time went on, the "cowboy west" turned more into a "Zorro west," exploring themes of revolution and "swashbuckling freedom-fighting outlaws struggling against the regime." Social class became oddly important, which had never been a component of our previous campaigns.
Big Mac wrote: I already asked if any of your commercial work was connected to Serobi Wastes, but do you have any unpublished documentation from your home campaign?
Oh, man, I have a crap-load! :shock:

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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by Lance Hawvermale » Fri Feb 15, 2013 3:28 am

Havard wrote:Any chance of you posting those classes? A Matador Class sounds like it would be a lot of fun!
The most recent write-up I have for them is their conversion to 2E kits ("Fortune Favors the Dead" is a 2E adventure.) I'd be happy to post them, and if you like, you can reverse-engineer them to work in your favorite rules system.
Havard wrote:And yeah, any suggestions for stats for Tonja in case I want to use her as an NPC?
No problem. What's your game system of choice? :D

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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by Boneguard » Fri Feb 15, 2013 12:43 pm

Lance Hawvermale wrote:
Havard wrote:Any chance of you posting those classes? A Matador Class sounds like it would be a lot of fun!
The most recent write-up I have for them is their conversion to 2E kits ("Fortune Favors the Dead" is a 2E adventure.) I'd be happy to post them, and if you like, you can reverse-engineer them to work in your favorite rules system.
If you could it would be great. I'm still pretty much a 1st/2nd edition guy (and I love Savage Coast) myself and I'd also love to see those new class/kits you made.
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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by Lance Hawvermale » Fri Feb 15, 2013 5:06 pm

Boneguard wrote:If you could it would be great. I'm still pretty much a 1st/2nd edition guy (and I love Savage Coast) myself and I'd also love to see those new class/kits you made.
Gaucho
The Gaucho is a warrior of the pampas, the sweeping grasslands of Guadalante. Normally, the Gaucho herds cattle and other livestock, living off the land for weeks at a time, then entering town for a little boisterous rest and relaxation. Gauchos are remarkable horsemen and wranglers, renowned for their ruggedness, their willpower, and their casual disdain for the high-minded politics of the upper class. They are ranchers, or—if they stand on the other side of the law—they are cattle rustlers. In whatever form, they are free-spirited and restless. Gauchos may not begin play as members of the upper-middle-class or higher in social standing, unless a young noble has left his villa to follow the “romantic” life of the drifter. Gauchos are seldom Lawful in alignment. They believe in brotherhood, yet at the same time are fiercely independent. Though they love to cavort in the cities and attend the gay fiestas, they distrust city folk as a rule, and are generally seen as uncouth and ill-mannered by Guadalante’s more “refined” citizenry. Yet they are also viewed as skilled professionals who labor daily to tame the savage frontier.

Role: Gauchos are unruly frontier riders who spend their lives on horseback. When not herding, a Gaucho might live as a bandito, or enter a small town in search of its cantina and its women. As an adventuresome lot, many Gauchos are inclined to enter the mercenary life, seeking treasure and fortune wherever it hides. They care little for politics and theology, save their own personal code of conduct and faith. Gauchos may be crude and uneducated, but many are quite skilled at storytelling and musicianship. In an adventuring party, Gauchos often serve as point men or scouts.

Weapon Proficiencies: Gauchos must be skilled in the lasso. Other possible weapons include dagger, sabre, bola, spear, broadsword, whip, and light crossbow, though certain Gauchos might favor less traditional arms, such as the axe or mace.

Bonus Proficiencies: Riding, and one of the following: Rope Use, Animal Handling, Cooking, Weather Sense, Survival, Hunting, or Gaming.

Special Benefits: Gauchos may make an Intelligence check at +4 to determine the quality of any horse. They receive a +4 bonus to Land-based Riding, and a +2 bonus to any other nonweapon proficiency from the list above. Furthermore, Gauchos can calm any spooked horse with a successful Wisdom check, and they can “break” wild horses after six consecutive hours of work and a successful Wisdom check. If this check fails, another six hours of training permits a second check. If this check fails, however, the Gaucho is unable to tame the horse. Gauchos may improve their breaking skill as if it were a proficiency, effectively improving their Wisdom by 1 for purposes of breaking a horse every time a slot is spent on this ability. Exceptionally feral mustangs might impose penalties to this check.

Special Restrictions: Gauchos must pay an additional proficiency slot for every nonweapon proficiency that is considered “civilized” or “educated,” such as Reading/Writing, Etiquette, History, or Languages. Essentially, any skill that has Intelligence as its ability modifier costs the Gaucho one additional slot. Gauchos cannot abide the urban life for extended periods of time; after twelve hours in any city, all physical attributes such as Strength and Dexterity are considered one point lower. After two days, this penalty becomes -2, and persists until the Gaucho can get back into the wild and “refresh” there for at least a full day. This condition lends the Gauchos their reputation for coming into town for a single night of fun and excitement and riding away with the morning sun.

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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by Boneguard » Fri Feb 15, 2013 5:47 pm

That's a cool kit!

Must. supress. jealousy. for. not. thinking. of. it. first. ;p
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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by Lance Hawvermale » Sat Feb 16, 2013 1:15 am

Matador

The Matador is the bullfighter of Guadalante, part showman and part fearless warrior. Though Matadors are primarily entertainers, they are also skilled technicians and redoubtable artists. The Matador might be considered the gladiator of Guadalante, although he depends less upon brute force and more upon sheer agility. A successful Matador can achieve great fame and wealth. In social circles a popular Matador stands on equal footing with clergymen and lesser nobles. Many of them are also renowned for their skills at dance. Both males and females may be Matadors.

Role: In Guadalante the bullfight is known as la fiesta brava (“the brave festival”) or la corrida de toros (“the running of the bulls”). The corrida, as it is popularly known, takes place before crowds of enthusiasts, often numbering many thousands. Traditionally, the bullfight is a combination of ritual and mortal combat, with an attempt to maneuver a bull gracefully and kill it in a manner both courageous and aesthetically unrepugnant.

Six bulls, to be killed by three Matadors, are usually required for one afternoon’s corrida, and each encounter lasts about fifteen rounds. At the appointed time, the three Matadors, each followed by their assistants—the banderilleros and the picadors—march into the ring to the accompaniment of traditional paso doble (“march rhythm”) music. The Matadors wear a distinctive costume, consisting of a silk jacket heavily embroidered in gold, skintight pants, and a montera (a bicorne hat). A traje de luces(“suit of lights”), as it is known, can cost several thousand pieces of gold; a high-ranking Matador must have at least six of them a season.

When a bull first comes into the arena out of the toril, or bull pen gate, the Matador greets it with a series of maneuvers, or passes, with a large cape; these passes are usually veronicas, the basic cape maneuver (named for the woman who held out a cup to St. Santiago of Ciban on his way to his execution).

The amount of applause the Matador receives is based on his proximity to the horns of the bull, his tranquility in the face of danger, and his grace in swinging the cape in front of an infuriated animal weighing more than a thousand pounds. The bull instinctively goes for the cloth because it is a large, moving target, not because of its color; bulls are color-blind and charge just as readily at the inside of the cape, which is yellow.

Fighting bulls charge instantly at anything that moves because of their natural instinct and centuries of special breeding. Unlike domestic bulls, they do not have to be trained to charge, nor are they starved or tortured to make them savage. Those animals selected for the corrida are allowed to live a year longer than those assigned to the slaughter house. Bulls to be fought by novilleros (“beginners”) are supposed to be three years old, and those fought by full Matadors are supposed to be at least four.

The second part of the corrida consists of the work of the picadors, bearing lances and mounted on horses. The picadors wear flat-brimmed, beige felt hats, silver-embroidered jackets, chamois trousers, and steel leg armor. After three lancings or less, depending on the judgment of the president of the corrida for that day, a trumpet blows, and the banderilleros, working on foot, advance to place their banderillas (brightly adorned, barbed sticks) in the bull’s shoulders in order to lower its head for the eventual kill. They wear costumes similar to those of their Matadors, but their jackets and pants are embroidered in silver.

After the placing of the banderillas, a trumpet sounds, signaling the last phase of the fight. Although the bull has been weakened and slowed, it has also become warier during the course of the fight, sensing that behind the cape is its true enemy; most gorings occur at this time. The muleta (a small, more easily wielded cape) is draped over the estoque (a sword much like a rapier), and the Matador begins what is called the faena, the last act of the bullfight. The aficionados study the Matador’s every move, the ballet-like passes practiced since childhood. (Most Matadors come from bullfighting families and learn their art when very young.) As with every maneuver in the ring, the emphasis is on the ability to increase but control the personal danger, maintaining the balance between suicide and mere survival. In other words, the real contest is not between the Matador and an animal; it is the Matador’s internal struggle.

The kill, properly done by aiming straight over the bull’s horns and plunging the sword between its withers into the aorta region, requires discipline, training, and raw courage; for this reason it is known as the “moment of truth.” Bullfighters generally expect to receive at least one goring a season.

Weapon Proficiencies: The Matador must become proficient in the estoque, a specialized rapier. By 3rd level he must also select the shield proficiency and apply it to the bullfighting cape. This permits the cape to be used to gain a +1 bonus to the warrior’s AC.

Bonus Proficiencies: Tumbling, and one of the following: Arena Acting, Etiquette, Crowd Working, or Dancing.

Special Benefits: The Matador receives a +4 or +20% to any check involved with bullfighting. The Matadors also benefit from love of the people. All bullfighters, regardless of their success, are adored and honored by the folk, both commoners and noblemen alike. They can request boarding and food from almost anyone of any social class, so long as the Matador is either in his hometown or in a town where his fame has preceded him. Matadors of high esteem are frequently the distinguished guests of nobility. Their way in life is often paved for them, and their nights are full of secret trysts, clandestine arrangements, political conspiracies, and adventuresome liaisons. Matadors are romantic figures, and as such lead a singularly intriguing life.

Special Hindrances: Matadors usually spend at least four days a week in practice. Only during performances do they don their finery and hear the roar of the crowd; the rest of the time they’re working with their assistants to the point of exhaustion. PC Matadors, being active individuals honing their talents in the field, can often get away with only two days of practice each week, but if this practice time is ignored, the Matador loses all bonuses to his bullfighting ability until he practices for a solid, uninterrupted week.

The Matador might be called upon any time by a member of the nobility, for any variety of reasons. It is unwise to turn a deaf ear to a nobleman. Matadors must strive to always stay on the good side of the noble families, as their livelihood depends upon the good graces of such patrons.

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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by Boneguard » Sat Feb 16, 2013 2:03 am

That's another cool kit...also looksl ike there's been quite a bit of research there too.
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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by Lance Hawvermale » Sat Feb 16, 2013 3:17 am

Havard wrote:And yeah, any suggestions for stats for Tonja in case I want to use her as an NPC? :)
This is her 2E stat block:

Tonja, human female W7: AC 10; MV 12; hp 16, THAC0 18; #AT 1; Dmg by weapon type or spell; SD stoneskin spell; Str 8, Dex 15, Con 14, Int 15, Wis 12, Cha 15; ML 14; AL LE; XP 975; wand of paralyzation tied to her crossbow and rigged to fire with a trigger pull rather than command word, potion of flying (two doses), waterskin.

Spells (4/3/2/1): 1st--charm person (x2), magic missile (x2); 2nd--blindness, invisibility, Tonja's touchtrap (see below); 3rd--lightning bolt, wraithform; 4th--stoneskin.

Tonja's touchtrap
(Alteration)
Level: 2
Range: 50 yards +5 yards/level
Components: V, S, M
Casting time: 2
Duration: 1 turn/level
Area of effect: 1 object
Saving throw: Negates

This spell can be cast on any non-living object of roughly man-sized or smaller. Casting this spell coats the object in an invisible and magical adhesive that automatically bonds to whatever touches it. Only a successful saving throw vs. spell prevents the offending article from being stuck to the touchtrap for the limit of the spell's duration. The only way to extricate oneself from the touchtrap before the spell expires is by a timely application of universal solvent, a successful dispel magic, or a limited wish. The material component is the object to be trapped.

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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by TBeholder » Sat Dec 13, 2014 12:31 pm

ripvanwormer wrote:So it does! I thought it felt like a Savage Coast adventure. Strangely, though, the adventure doesn't seem like it would work in Mystara's Guadalante at all. There's no desert there, or a coast. The maps look nothing alike. It would work better in Cimarron.
Perhaps the author just included the name Guadalante as a hint or shout-out to Savage Coast fans.
Havard wrote:[img ]http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8514/8465 ... 4f3841.jpg[ /img]
Here's the cover art for Dungeon #80, apparently linked to the adventure "Fortune Favors the Dead".
Good Savage Coast art? :)
So we have: some names and art for Savage Coast and map and other details that are nothing like Savage Coast. Looks like yet another "several sources carelessly conflated together" case. Of course, the same cover refers to another adventure ("The Frothing Miscreant") not by the name used in the magazine itself. So it may well be "make it generic" editing half-done after the cover was already submitted to print.
Hey, after all, those are TSR/WotC editors. As long as important matters are cared for - such as stopping the rumours about marital infidelity of the Queen Guinevere...
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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by Havard » Sat Dec 13, 2014 12:50 pm

Check out the comment by the author I provided earlier in the thread. The module was not written specifically with the Savage Coast in mind, but the author was influenced by the original X9 as well as Western films.

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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by Lance Hawvermale » Sat Dec 13, 2014 2:36 pm

TBeholder wrote:Looks like yet another "several sources carelessly conflated together" case. Of course, the same cover refers to another adventure ("The Frothing Miscreant") not by the name used in the magazine itself. So it may well be "make it generic" editing half-done after the cover was already submitted to print.
Not the case at all, actually. Read the previous posts.

The module was written at least a year before I ever submitted it to Dungeon and was edited and polished by their staff quite some time before being delivered to the cover artist. I sent a synopsis of the adventure to artist Mark Zugg. The cover was designed specifically for that adventure--which was itself inspired by the Emilio Estevez film Dollar for the Dead--as I am quoted as saying earlier in this thread. The cover piece is formally titled "Tonja and the Raiders." My girlfriend at the time was named Tonja, and the woman in Mark's art is his version of her. The name "Guadalante" is a direct tip of the hat to my fond memories of that setting during my early days.

Mark was specifically enamored of my idea of having the NPC's magic wand attached to a crossbow. Because my "D&D western" couldn't feature firearms, I had to invent something close. :D

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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by ghendar » Sat Dec 13, 2014 3:00 pm

ripvanwormer wrote:
For whatever reason the adventure seems to assume Oerth as the default world, but I think it'd work a lot better with Mystara considering Mystara has a land similar to Guadalante and Oerth, canonically, doesn't.
I haven't looked at Greyhawk in a long time but I don't recall any part of it where this adventure would fit.
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Re: Dungeon #80

Post by ripvanwormer » Sat Dec 13, 2014 8:07 pm

ghendar wrote:
ripvanwormer wrote:
For whatever reason the adventure seems to assume Oerth as the default world, but I think it'd work a lot better with Mystara considering Mystara has a land similar to Guadalante and Oerth, canonically, doesn't.
I haven't looked at Greyhawk in a long time but I don't recall any part of it where this adventure would fit.
The adventure itself recommends "south of Hepmonaland."

Probably this means "Part of the continent of Hepmonaland, but south of the Darlene Map," or perhaps an island. It could be a former colony established by colonists from the Lordship of the Isles or the Sea Princes.

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