[profession] Skinning

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[profession] Skinning

Post by Big Mac » Sun Jul 26, 2015 7:48 pm

I've spoken about raiding various things from the MMO, to make the tabletop game a bit more intersting, and I think that skinning is one of the non-combat elements of the World of Warcraft game that could theoretically add to the tabletop game.

In the MMO, skinning pretty much gives you a way for your PC to earn a bit of cash out of the sort of grinding activity, where you need to kill dozens of the same monster. I'm not so sure that a tabletop GM would want to do that, but if skinning was seen to be a way that a lot of adventurers "earn a bit of extra cash" on the side, I think that some tabletop players would buy it on that basis.

I've even wondered if it would be worth making the main MMO "farming professions" into D&D skills that are easier to take (either by having them considered as class skills for all classes) or by some other mechanic that rewards players who take them.

Anyhoo, looking at the Skinning article on Wowpedia, you can see that you get more than 30 types of leather, more than 10 types of hides and over 30 different types of scale that you can extract from the bodies of critters.

In D&D terms, I think that some of those leathers, hides and scales should qualify as special materials. I'm not sure if the RPG books already do this for any of them, but it might be fun to look at the 70+ list of skinnable critters to decide what is mundane and what might provide some sort of bonus to items made from it.

If some items were especially useful, I can see a situation where the players want to take PCs that have the skinning skill (and skills for the other "farming" professions) so that, their group can earn a bit of extra money from adventures, by looking out for "valuable" monsters and killing them to get the skin. :)

Looking at the selling price (which would probably need to converted to D&D terms, unless you were running a game with MMO coin-rates) would be a good way to decide what sort of "bounties" would be paid for various leather, hide and scales.

But looking at the sort of things that could be made from that leather, hide and scales, could be a way to tweak the numbers you get from Medieval Demographics, so that you can make sure that there are enough tradesmen, who work with skinnable items, to give people places to sell common stuff and to force them to travel to larger towns and cities to sell rare or unique leather, hide or scale items.
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Re: [profession] Skinning

Post by Mcgeneral » Wed Jul 29, 2015 2:23 pm

I spend some time making herbalism and mining available for my campaign. The ores can just be sold for gold or can be used for discount at a blacksmith. I actually completely overhauled the alchemy profession from More Magic and Mayhem so one could craft potions from the herbs they found. After several sessions, I have found out that mining ores is not really popular. It's just a passive way to earn money. Herbalism on the other hand is popular, seeing you can actually get useful items through alchemy. I thought about adding skinning, but waited to see if mining would add any value to the game. I doubt it will be used in our campaign, so for now i'm staying away from it.

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Re: [profession] Skinning

Post by Arrius Nideal » Wed Jul 29, 2015 5:00 pm

I've thrown it under a Hunting skill, which is classified as a gathering skill (along with herbalism and mining).

Gathering skills can be worked at as if crafting skills (taking hours, up to 8 hours) to gather raw materials. The value is usually 1/2 the check x 1/2 the skill ranks in the skill x 1/2 the time worked in hours. The result is in gold pieces.

So a 4th level tinker who put (6) ranks into Gathering (Mining) and takes 10 (+8 to the check, total 18) on a mining check on an iron vein for (four hours), for example, would extract 54 gp worth of iron (9 x 3 x 2), which can be used for crafting iron-based materials. I call this a material floating pool, and usually allow for material pouches to hold a specific value before being filled (50 gp = 5 lb).

Hunting is thus a skill check of the same type, except that it extracts leathers. I also rule that one can make leathers with an armor bonus from +1 to +9, depending on the natural armor bonus of the creature, with a cost equal to that of a metallic armor of the same bonus to AC (and armor check penalty and spell failure, of course).

It's a good way to work on downtime if your GM is a fan of longer campaigns.

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Re: [profession] Skinning

Post by Big Mac » Thu Aug 13, 2015 1:14 am

Mcgeneral wrote:I spend some time making herbalism and mining available for my campaign. The ores can just be sold for gold or can be used for discount at a blacksmith.
I've been considering starting up another topic to discuss Mining. It sounds like you could share some useful ideas on that. :)
Mcgeneral wrote:I actually completely overhauled the alchemy profession from More Magic and Mayhem so one could craft potions from the herbs they found.
I guess I should consider staring up a topic to discuss Herbalism too. I'd be interested to know more about that, but it would probably be better not to mix everything up in one topic. :D
Mcgeneral wrote:After several sessions, I have found out that mining ores is not really popular. It's just a passive way to earn money. Herbalism on the other hand is popular, seeing you can actually get useful items through alchemy.
I think all the professions have an element of "grinding" to them in the MMO. (Even fishing can be a bit tedious.) So I guess that it is down to individual players to decide if a specific profession interests them.

The experience you have with your players is pretty interesting, as I'm guessing that it takes as much effort to convert a part of the MMO that they don't get excited about, as it does to convert an element that they really enjoy. I wonder if other players would see more of a motivation to use different MMO professions, or if your experience with Herbalism being "more interesting" would be shared by other GMs.

I'm not sure we have a large enough fanbase here to do a survey about the MMO Professions, but if anyone thinks it is worth doing, perhaps we could run one. What do you think? (Perhaps running an open-ended survey could make up for the fact that the WoW fanbase is smaller than that of other settings, like Mystara, as we might pull in additional answers over time, when WoW: RPG fans, who are not yet members discover the fanbase still exists. :idea: )
Mcgeneral wrote:I thought about adding skinning, but waited to see if mining would add any value to the game. I doubt it will be used in our campaign, so for now i'm staying away from it.
I'm wondering how "sexy" skinning would be too. But I figured that if I bounced it off of the rest of the fans, there might be a quick and easy way to use it and then expand it via MMO detail, if a player buys into it. I'm kind of inspired by BECMI D&D. The old-school BECMI D&D game starts off with "Basic" rules, and then added "Expert" rules later, with "Companions", "Master" and "Immortals" expansions adding more and more rules. I'm guessing that starting with the "low skill" MMO stuff could be the way to test the water with something like Skinning. You would get a workable system, but wouldn't need to add extra stuff, like magic skinning tools or a variety of animal skins, unless players wanted to "level up".
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Re: [profession] Skinning

Post by Big Mac » Thu Aug 13, 2015 3:08 am

Arrius Nideal wrote:I've thrown it under a Hunting skill, which is classified as a gathering skill (along with herbalism and mining).
That makes sense. I guess it counts as "a thing you can do with Hunting", if you have the tools.
Arrius Nideal wrote:Gathering skills can be worked at as if crafting skills (taking hours, up to 8 hours) to gather raw materials. The value is usually 1/2 the check x 1/2 the skill ranks in the skill x 1/2 the time worked in hours. The result is in gold pieces.

So a 4th level tinker who put (6) ranks into Gathering (Mining) and takes 10 (+8 to the check, total 18) on a mining check on an iron vein for (four hours), for example, would extract 54 gp worth of iron (9 x 3 x 2), which can be used for crafting iron-based materials. I call this a material floating pool, and usually allow for material pouches to hold a specific value before being filled (50 gp = 5 lb).
That sounds like a really great way of avoiding having to have several different rules for players to learn. :cool:

I guess that skill check, and the number of skill points give you a representation of how good somebody is at carving out the "good rock". I suppose that smelting is really a process where you melt down all the ore and get rid of the "bad stuff". :)

One thing I do wonder about, though, is the fact that some gathered materials are worth more or less than others. 50 gp worth or iron or 50 gp worth of platinum should have a different weight (and should take up a different amount of space) but I'm concious of the fact that over-stressing the "realism" would make for a more "clunky" system that might cross the border from being "better roleplaying" into being "better rollplaying".

And gathering metal ore would involve collecting heavy rocks, while collecting plants would give you relatively light stuff, that might need to be carefully packed. (So a bag of leaves might be big and bulky, but not very heavy.) The MMO is all about "space" while D&D has rules about how much weight you can carry, so there could be a potential conflict with the conversion there.

But I suppose that, from a tabletop-time point of view, it is possible to accelerate time and not do gathering stuff in real-time. That should hopefully make it more fun and less like "grinding". I even think this is an area where fans of other tabletop campaign settings, could take inspiration from the sheer level of detail in the WoW: MMO (and other MMOs).
Arrius Nideal wrote:Hunting is thus a skill check of the same type, except that it extracts leathers. I also rule that one can make leathers with an armor bonus from +1 to +9, depending on the natural armor bonus of the creature, with a cost equal to that of a metallic armor of the same bonus to AC (and armor check penalty and spell failure, of course).
Taking the natural armor bonus of the skinned creature seems like a really clever way of extrapolating additional detail for a tabletop version of Skinning, without needing to design a ton of skinning tables. :cool:

Would you see the AC of the armour being a straight conversion of creature AC to armor bonus or would you use a skill check to see if a character who is skinning a critter is able to get the full advantage of the skin of the critter? (In the MMO, characters are not physically able to skin the "difficult" critters, until the improve their Skinning score. I'm assuming that they would destroy the skin in the attempt, or just know not to attempt it.) Do you think it would be worth saying that someone can only skin leather that grants +1 if they have one skill point, for example? Or would you allow a low-level PC, to "gather" +9 leather from a critter? :?
Arrius Nideal wrote:It's a good way to work on downtime if your GM is a fan of longer campaigns.
I'm a big fan of that sort of stuff. When I design PCs, I always throw a percentage of skill points into "how does my PC earn money in between adventure" stuff. It helps me feel that my PC is a "real person", but people into min-maxing tend to see that as "me wasting skill points".

One thing you need with leather/skinning, is some sort of rule about dead critters decomposing. People that skin animals need to do it before the skin is useless and they probably need to get the skin preserved within a reasonable amount of time. That sort of thing is good for downtime too, as a party member who does this sort of stuff, would have a number of contacts, in various villages, towns and cities, for picking up supplies for tanning leather...or for trading away fresh pelts. And I think that you could probably use those NPC contacts...some of the time, to feed information to the PC.

From an uptime, point of view, if there are any sort of dangerous animals in the area that PCs are visiting, your PC with the skinning tools, could find out that NPCs are selling leather recovered from those animals...or that they are reporting that they had to flee from animals that they were unable to hunt. So, you end up with a possible adventure hook, from Skinning. :D
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Re: [profession] Skinning

Post by Arrius Nideal » Sat Aug 15, 2015 3:40 pm

Big Mac wrote:One thing I do wonder about, though, is the fact that some gathered materials are worth more or less than others. 50 gp worth or iron or 50 gp worth of platinum should have a different weight (and should take up a different amount of space) but I'm concious of the fact that over-stressing the "realism" would make for a more "clunky" system that might cross the border from being "better roleplaying" into being "better rollplaying".

And gathering metal ore would involve collecting heavy rocks, while collecting plants would give you relatively light stuff, that might need to be carefully packed. (So a bag of leaves might be big and bulky, but not very heavy.) The MMO is all about "space" while D&D has rules about how much weight you can carry, so there could be a potential conflict with the conversion there.
Density brings up a bit too much intricacy to the system. That is an issue.
I would prefer in this case to make the floating value also have a floating inventory space (20 lb, or as equal to a sack or crate) per use or per two hours of gathering. The materials may then be declared to reduce the effective space, or remain undeclared until needed.
Big Mac wrote:Would you see the AC of the armour being a straight conversion of creature AC to armor bonus or would you use a skill check to see if a character who is skinning a critter is able to get the full advantage of the skin of the critter? (In the MMO, characters are not physically able to skin the "difficult" critters, until the improve their Skinning score. I'm assuming that they would destroy the skin in the attempt, or just know not to attempt it.) Do you think it would be worth saying that someone can only skin leather that grants +1 if they have one skill point, for example? Or would you allow a low-level PC, to "gather" +9 leather from a critter? :? .
That is an entirely possible restriction--one cannot invest more natural armor in a single suit of armor than 1 point per rank in Skinning. But I'd rather not: blacksmithing has no such prerequisites, and I'd rather add less rules than strictly necessary for a subsystem.
Big Mac wrote:I'm a big fan of that sort of stuff. When I design PCs, I always throw a percentage of skill points into "how does my PC earn money in between adventure" stuff. It helps me feel that my PC is a "real person", but people into min-maxing tend to see that as "me wasting skill points".
Since gathering skills can be used for crafting in downtime and be quite efficient, I suppose everyone would get at least one rank in each.
Big Mac wrote:One thing you need with leather/skinning, is some sort of rule about dead critters decomposing. People that skin animals need to do it before the skin is useless and they probably need to get the skin preserved within a reasonable amount of time. That sort of thing is good for downtime too, as a party member who does this sort of stuff, would have a number of contacts, in various villages, towns and cities, for picking up supplies for tanning leather...or for trading away fresh pelts. And I think that you could probably use those NPC contacts...some of the time, to feed information to the PC.
I actually do have five stages of decomposition dying into other rules--such as what kind of creatures appear when casting Animate Undead I-IX (zombies only in the first three stages), etc. But from a game design standpoint, it's best if the skill's listed tools subsume all requirements, with the referee popping in with another requirement whenever needed.
Big Mac wrote:From an uptime, point of view, if there are any sort of dangerous animals in the area that PCs are visiting, your PC with the skinning tools, could find out that NPCs are selling leather recovered from those animals...or that they are reporting that they had to flee from animals that they were unable to hunt. So, you end up with a possible adventure hook, from Skinning. :D
Exactly! Since you can also harvest creatures (I think I detailed it somewhere else before) for materials, you could also do the bit Arthas did in Warcraft III, in which he harvested the heart of Searinox to get his heart--which can be used to make something else or pay for a spell.
The possibilities are many, to say the least.

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Re: [profession] Skinning

Post by Big Mac » Thu Aug 20, 2015 11:55 pm

Arrius Nideal wrote:
Big Mac wrote:One thing I do wonder about, though, is the fact that some gathered materials are worth more or less than others. 50 gp worth or iron or 50 gp worth of platinum should have a different weight (and should take up a different amount of space) but I'm concious of the fact that over-stressing the "realism" would make for a more "clunky" system that might cross the border from being "better roleplaying" into being "better rollplaying".

And gathering metal ore would involve collecting heavy rocks, while collecting plants would give you relatively light stuff, that might need to be carefully packed. (So a bag of leaves might be big and bulky, but not very heavy.) The MMO is all about "space" while D&D has rules about how much weight you can carry, so there could be a potential conflict with the conversion there.
Density brings up a bit too much intricacy to the system. That is an issue.
I would prefer in this case to make the floating value also have a floating inventory space (20 lb, or as equal to a sack or crate) per use or per two hours of gathering. The materials may then be declared to reduce the effective space, or remain undeclared until needed.
I agree. You want to encourage roleplaying - not ruleplaying. Rules are mathematics, and over-complex rules make people do too many sums.

I guess that, if we bring this back to skinning, the way I'm thinking about this, you have a PC using a knife to cut the skin off of dead animals. Presumably, they could butcher the animal at the same time to create food, for the adventuring party, but the person who has learned the skinning profession is working hard to keep that skin intact, so that it can be sold or used.

I'm finding it hard to think of a skin cut off a giant bear and a small rock with a bit of gold in it, in the same terms, when it comes to how awkward it is to carry them around. (I guess that, from one point of view, you don't have to worry too much about this, unless one of the players tries to manipulate the system.)
Arrius Nideal wrote:
Big Mac wrote:Would you see the AC of the armour being a straight conversion of creature AC to armor bonus or would you use a skill check to see if a character who is skinning a critter is able to get the full advantage of the skin of the critter? (In the MMO, characters are not physically able to skin the "difficult" critters, until the improve their Skinning score. I'm assuming that they would destroy the skin in the attempt, or just know not to attempt it.) Do you think it would be worth saying that someone can only skin leather that grants +1 if they have one skill point, for example? Or would you allow a low-level PC, to "gather" +9 leather from a critter? :? .
That is an entirely possible restriction--one cannot invest more natural armor in a single suit of armor than 1 point per rank in Skinning. But I'd rather not: blacksmithing has no such prerequisites, and I'd rather add less rules than strictly necessary for a subsystem.
I'm more thinking that it is impossible for a PC to skin some animals (in the MMO) until they have increased their skinning score. That would seem to be the same sort of thing as saying that the DC of skinning an animal varies like the SRD suggests:
Difficulty class|Example (Skill Used) Very easy (0)|Notice something large in plain sight (Spot) Easy (5)|Climb a knotted rope (Climb) Average (10)|Hear an approaching guard (Listen) Tough (15)|Rig a wagon wheel to fall off (Disable Device) Challenging (20)|Swim in stormy water (Swim) Formidable (25)|Open an average lock (Open Lock) Heroic (30)|Leap across a 30-foot chasm (Jump) Nearly impossible (40)|Track a squad of orcs across hard ground after 24 hours of rainfall (Survival)

I'm figuring that the right column could be entirely replaced by very easy, easy, average, tough, challenging, formidable, heroic and nearly impossible things that can be done with the skinning skill.

I picked on making higher AC critters as an example of a possible thing that is harder to skin, but maybe that is a bad example. Perhaps there are other ways that a PC that spends time putting more points into skinning could "unlock" the ability to do more with it.
Arrius Nideal wrote:
Big Mac wrote:I'm a big fan of that sort of stuff. When I design PCs, I always throw a percentage of skill points into "how does my PC earn money in between adventure" stuff. It helps me feel that my PC is a "real person", but people into min-maxing tend to see that as "me wasting skill points".
Since gathering skills can be used for crafting in downtime and be quite efficient, I suppose everyone would get at least one rank in each.
Sure. But in tabletop terms, only buying one rank would represent somebody who only did the bare minimum amount of work, and who was not making an effort to improve. There should be higher level DC things, that they struggle to do and very high level DC things that they find impossible.

IIRC, there are rules somewhere about rolling a DC to see how much your PC can earn. For a PC with one skill point, I would guess that they are having some successes, but also struggling at times and that they would damage some animal skins (and either have to cut them up, to recover the usable bits or throw them away and kill more animals to skin.

I think that skinning would be great for someone prepared to live in the wild, as they would be trapping and killing animals as they moved around and skinning would tie into eating. So I could buy into that PC either being in adventuring mode (where they are not spending so much time on getting animal skins) and being in "nomadic mode" (where they are much more able to hunt and skin animals, but less able to move around quickly).

I don't know if you have your players run multiple "backup PCs" at the same time (like the way that the MMO lets people run several PCs on the same server, but only play one at a time) but I can imagine a "multi-PC" game where the in-use PCs were all doing adventure stuff, and the out-of-use PCs were all floating around in the region harvesting things according to their professions and doing other stuff that is now worthy of being done in-character.
Arrius Nideal wrote:
Big Mac wrote:One thing you need with leather/skinning, is some sort of rule about dead critters decomposing. People that skin animals need to do it before the skin is useless and they probably need to get the skin preserved within a reasonable amount of time. That sort of thing is good for downtime too, as a party member who does this sort of stuff, would have a number of contacts, in various villages, towns and cities, for picking up supplies for tanning leather...or for trading away fresh pelts. And I think that you could probably use those NPC contacts...some of the time, to feed information to the PC.
I actually do have five stages of decomposition dying into other rules--such as what kind of creatures appear when casting Animate Undead I-IX (zombies only in the first three stages), etc. But from a game design standpoint, it's best if the skill's listed tools subsume all requirements, with the referee popping in with another requirement whenever needed.
I guess that skinning an animal and cleaning the skin would drastically slow down (if not stop) the decomposition process. I can't see PCs carrying around untreated leather for years at a time (instead of offloading it at a village or town to make money) so I don't suppose you need to worry about this too much.
Arrius Nideal wrote:
Big Mac wrote:From an uptime, point of view, if there are any sort of dangerous animals in the area that PCs are visiting, your PC with the skinning tools, could find out that NPCs are selling leather recovered from those animals...or that they are reporting that they had to flee from animals that they were unable to hunt. So, you end up with a possible adventure hook, from Skinning. :D
Exactly! Since you can also harvest creatures (I think I detailed it somewhere else before) for materials, you could also do the bit Arthas did in Warcraft III, in which he harvested the heart of Searinox to get his heart--which can be used to make something else or pay for a spell.
The possibilities are many, to say the least.
I don't suppose you can remember where you posted this? Was it on Xander 212's forums?

I guess I would say that harvesting hearts would be a lot tougher than removing leather from an animal. I'm not sure of the relative difficulty, but I do know that they say that people doing human sacrifices were able to remove hearts while they were still beating. So they must have been fairly careful, as well as fast, to do that.

That's a bit of a grim use for the skinning profession, but I guess that someone could use skinning tools to clean the flesh off of bones or even use them to extract entire tendons out of animals.

I'm not entirely sure what could be done with various extracted body-parts, aside from having meat to eat, but with magic users using animal parts as the material components for some spells, I guess there would be a market for harvesting various things (as well as skin).
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Re: [profession] Skinning

Post by Arrius Nideal » Fri Aug 21, 2015 9:10 pm

Big Mac wrote:I guess that, if we bring this back to skinning, the way I'm thinking about this, you have a PC using a knife to cut the skin off of dead animals. Presumably, they could butcher the animal at the same time to create food, for the adventuring party, but the person who has learned the skinning profession is working hard to keep that skin intact, so that it can be sold or used.
I'll come back to this with my last post, where I detail the harvest pool of creatures.
Big Mac wrote:I'm more thinking that it is impossible for a PC to skin some animals (in the MMO) until they have increased their skinning score. That would seem to be the same sort of thing as saying that the DC of skinning an animal varies like the SRD suggests:
Difficulty class|Example (Skill Used) Very easy (0)|Notice something large in plain sight (Spot) Easy (5)|Climb a knotted rope (Climb) Average (10)|Hear an approaching guard (Listen) Tough (15)|Rig a wagon wheel to fall off (Disable Device) Challenging (20)|Swim in stormy water (Swim) Formidable (25)|Open an average lock (Open Lock) Heroic (30)|Leap across a 30-foot chasm (Jump) Nearly impossible (40)|Track a squad of orcs across hard ground after 24 hours of rainfall (Survival)

I'm figuring that the right column could be entirely replaced by very easy, easy, average, tough, challenging, formidable, heroic and nearly impossible things that can be done with the skinning skill.

I picked on making higher AC critters as an example of a possible thing that is harder to skin, but maybe that is a bad example. Perhaps there are other ways that a PC that spends time putting more points into skinning could "unlock" the ability to do more with it.
The DC to harvest (through the Hunting skill, or Profession (Skinning)) is 15 + CR. Thus a higher-level creature would be more difficult to harvest.
Big Mac wrote:Sure. But in tabletop terms, only buying one rank would represent somebody who only did the bare minimum amount of work, and who was not making an effort to improve. There should be higher level DC things, that they struggle to do and very high level DC things that they find impossible.

IIRC, there are rules somewhere about rolling a DC to see how much your PC can earn. For a PC with one skill point, I would guess that they are having some successes, but also struggling at times and that they would damage some animal skins (and either have to cut them up, to recover the usable bits or throw them away and kill more animals to skin.
Business checks to earn money (through music, profession, etc.) grants gold pieces equal to (1/2 check result + 1/2 ranks in skill + 1/2 hours worked).
Ranks serve a good function in this case.
Big Mac wrote:I think that skinning would be great for someone prepared to live in the wild, as they would be trapping and killing animals as they moved around and skinning would tie into eating. So I could buy into that PC either being in adventuring mode (where they are not spending so much time on getting animal skins) and being in "nomadic mode" (where they are much more able to hunt and skin animals, but less able to move around quickly).
Quite so. Under these rules, a traveling party that is moving overland spends eight hours traveling, eight resting, and can spend another eight hours hunting/cooking/fighting.
Big Mac wrote:I don't know if you have your players run multiple "backup PCs" at the same time (like the way that the MMO lets people run several PCs on the same server, but only play one at a time) but I can imagine a "multi-PC" game where the in-use PCs were all doing adventure stuff, and the out-of-use PCs were all floating around in the region harvesting things according to their professions and doing other stuff that is now worthy of being done in-character.
I'd allow the player to control friends and family if they are in the region, or at least allow them to influence their behavior, but not direct control.
Big Mac wrote:I don't suppose you can remember where you posted this? Was it on Xander 212's forums?
Not sure. But regardless, here it is:
Arrius Nideal wrote:Harvesting a creature is a DC 15 + CR one-hour check. The maximum value of floating materials (hereby named Creature Trophies) is equal to CR^2 x 50 gp.
Special: The value is modified by 50% per each size category beyond medium. Large creatures possess 50% more, and Small creatures possess 50% less.
The value of harvested materials may be distributed according to player and referee agreement, divided upon whatever products a harvested creature could reasonably grant. The player must declare how evenly he will distribute the trophies, which may then be used to other skills or items.

Source Use
Creatures with natural armor Crafting armor with Leatherworking
Natural creatures Meat for Cooking
Rock-based creatures Floating material value of Mining.
Dragon bone Crafting armor with Blacksmithing
Fire dragon heart Providing IP* to level up and access Flaming infusions.
Creature with poison feature Crafting poisons based on the original
So in our case, a black dragon drake (large unique dragon, Searinox; CR 5 according to the Manual of Monsters), grants 5^2x50 (+50% from size) gp, or 1,875 gp if fully harvested. Arthas could (upon defeating Searinox), declare that 1,000 is the dragon's scales (which may be crafted into dragon-scale armor with a cost of 1,000 or less), declare 375 as dragon-bone to craft a dragonbone ring for Lady Proudmoore, and have the 500 gp left represent the drake's skull as a momento to his father. All this can be done with a DC 20 Profession (Skinning) check. Of course, the referee may rule that for each item Arthas wants to split, it would require another hour of skinning and a +2 to the DC, but such increases to DCs are circumstantial and left to the GM's judgment.

IP refers to infusion points, which is basically a skill inspired from WoW's inscription and enchantment skills: you can use the floating value of infusion to pay for magical item enchantments.
Example: A greathammer +1 costs 2,000 gp according to the SRD. Arthas could (if he knew the offer stood) declare that he will harvest 1,875 gp in 'fire IP' from Searinox, in which case, it would pay for nearly all of the enchantment's cost. Arthas would have to pay a little coin from himself (or ask for a 20% discount) to get his weapon enchanted to +1 (or get flaming).

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Big Mac
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Re: [profession] Skinning

Post by Big Mac » Wed Oct 07, 2015 4:51 pm

Thanks for the input. That looks like a pretty good way to do it.

I think I still like the idea of using some different leather, hide and scale to create special materials, but I also think it would be good to just use some of the names as flavour-text.
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