Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

Post by Big Mac »

I just found out on Faceborg that someone going by the name richgreen01 is building up some sort of Arabian city netbook on his At the Sign of the Green Man blog.

This city, called Parsantium has 223 pages on his blog so far. I've not even scratched the surface of what is there. But here is the Parsantium Index, which links to the most useful pages.

His World of Parsantium has its own map. It looks like it could be interesting in its own right, but I think someone might also be able to take his city, file off the serial numbers and use it as a Zakharan port. :)
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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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Great find! :)

Some nice pictures in that blog too :)

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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

Post by RichGreen »

Thanks guys!

I've been running two campaigns set in Parsantium for the last 4-5 years and most of the material on At the Sign of the Green Man is from those two games. What I'm doing currently is going back over all the material and revising it, as well as writing a whole bunch of new stuff - so far I'm at nearly 50,000 words and I reckon the final book will be 70-75,000. My intention is to publish the setting in a professionally produced sourcebook via drivethrurpg.com etc later this year. The book won't have many stats in it as I want it to be usable with all editions of D&D/Pathfinder.

This post should give you a good idea of what the setting is about - there are Arabic/Al-Qadim elements but it is also influenced by Oriental Adventures/China, India and Byzantium. If you're interested in reading more, I'll be posting regular design diaries on my blog.

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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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RichGreen wrote:Thanks guys!
Thanks to you, for coming over here. Welcome to The Piazza, Rich. :D
RichGreen wrote:I've been running two campaigns set in Parsantium for the last 4-5 years and most of the material on At the Sign of the Green Man is from those two games. What I'm doing currently is going back over all the material and revising it, as well as writing a whole bunch of new stuff - so far I'm at nearly 50,000 words and I reckon the final book will be 70-75,000. My intention is to publish the setting in a professionally produced sourcebook via drivethrurpg.com etc later this year. The book won't have many stats in it as I want it to be usable with all editions of D&D/Pathfinder.
You might also want to check out CreateSpace. They do Print on Demand, but also have an option to go via Amazon in the US and internationally. If you do that, the end price for people outside of the US may be considerably lower (as they will get local shipping charges).

There is a thread at The Piazza called Publishing your own RPG book with CreateSpace that links to a number of articles written by Casey Brown. He provides numbers for CreateSpace, so that might help you see how economical they would be.
RichGreen wrote:This post should give you a good idea of what the setting is about - there are Arabic/Al-Qadim elements but it is also influenced by Oriental Adventures/China, India and Byzantium. If you're interested in reading more, I'll be posting regular design diaries on my blog.
That looks pretty interesitng, as do the design diaries you have published so far. I like the map in diary number 11.
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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

Post by RichGreen »

Thanks! Will definitely check out CreateSpace and the thread you mentioned.

The first draft is going well – I'm nearly at 70,000 words and have half the organizations and the gods/religion chapter left to do. For the Akhrani (Arabian) culture, I'm thinking of going with one god, rather than another pantheon. I read an interview Scott Lynch did with Saladin Ahmed (author of Throne of the Crescent Moon) and he made a similar decision for his book after originally coming up with a full pantheon. I think this will seem a bit more Arabian/pseudo-Islamic and also provide a contrast to the other cultures which are polytheistic.

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Post by RichGreen »

Hi,

Just a quick note to say I've posted a new design diary here.

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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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Hi,

Just posted design diary no.14 here ;)

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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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Still very much a work in progress, but I have a new website for the Parsantium book here. If you get a chance to visit, please let me know what you think!

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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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Hi,

I've added a couple of blog posts to the Parsantium website one on art and one on naming imaginary places. Feedback on what kind of art you like to see in city sourcebooks and on fantasy place names appreciated!

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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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RichGreen wrote:Thanks! Will definitely check out CreateSpace and the thread you mentioned.
You're welcome. I'm sure there are other options out there, but when you have someone doing academic research into the publishing industry...and...also creating RPG material, that seems like a person that we might all be able to learn from.
RichGreen wrote:The first draft is going well – I'm nearly at 70,000 words and have half the organizations and the gods/religion chapter left to do. For the Akhrani (Arabian) culture, I'm thinking of going with one god, rather than another pantheon. I read an interview Scott Lynch did with Saladin Ahmed (author of Throne of the Crescent Moon) and he made a similar decision for his book after originally coming up with a full pantheon. I think this will seem a bit more Arabian/pseudo-Islamic and also provide a contrast to the other cultures which are polytheistic.
Have you moved from an Akhrani pantheon (in your old homebrew) to a single Akhrani deity in your new sourcebook?

Do you have a link for the Scott Lynch interview (where he explains his own reasons for the switch)?

Do you think you will retcon the pantheon out of Parsantium or have monotheism replace polytheism at some point in Parsantium's past?

And will you make the single deity into the only god in the world that Parsantium is on (the "one true god") or have sailors that visit Parsantium from elsewhere have strange gods and strange cultures?
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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

Post by RichGreen »

Thanks for all the questions!
Big Mac wrote: Have you moved from an Akhrani pantheon (in your old homebrew) to a single Akhrani deity in your new sourcebook?
Yes, I have – here's the first draft of Amur, the Sky God. Let me know what you think!

Amur, the Sky God
LG god of the Akhrani
Symbol: cloud
High Priest: Imam Efrat (see page XX)
Temples: Golden Mosque
Unlike the other human cultures in Parsantium, the Akhrani people worship only one god – Amur, the sky god who brings the life-giving rains and floods needed to grow crops in the hot desert climate of the Caliphate. Amur is a benevolent god, promising his worshippers an afterlife in the Seven Heavens if they follow his creed. This consists of six tenets – honouring Amur, hard work, alms-giving, prayer, self-denial and pilgrimage.

Followers of Amur must worship Amur, and Amur alone, as the One God. Energetic and honest farmers, merchants and craftsmen alike share a commitment to work hard , believing this will result in prosperity. It is also the duty of everyone to help those less fortunate than themselves, giving a proportion of their monthly income to those who need it most. Those who have little or no money are expected to do good deeds for others to fulfil this obligation.

Throughout the Old Quarter, the cries of the muezzin can be heard calling Amurites to prayer from the minarets of the mosques at dawn, noon, dusk and an hour before midnight. Worshippers should wash beforehand, using a small bowl of water, and prostrate themselves on the ground, facing in the direction of Qadisa, capital of the Caliphate of Akhran. During the month of Aprilis, Amurites will give up luxuries, including wine, coffee and meat and instead focus on prayer and repentance. Finally, every able-bodied worshipper of the god is expected to make a pilgrimage at least once in their life to the Grand Mosque in Qadisa.

There are no representations of Amur in his mosques –Amurites believe that since no mortal could possibly do justice to his divine form in a painting or sculpture, it would be blasphemous to try. Amur’s priests, known as imams, can be men or women, and are usually human, although there are few half-orc imams in Parsantium. They wear sky blue djellabas and gold holy symbols; the men have turbans while the women cover their heads with a blue scarf. Imams perform charitable deeds and also school local children who come to the mosques for religious and other teaching.
Big Mac wrote: Do you have a link for the Scott Lynch interview (where he explains his own reasons for the switch)?
Saladin Ahmed is the writer, Scott Lynch is the interviewer in this instance. It's in the Crescent Moons sampler which you can download for free.
Big Mac wrote:Do you think you will retcon the pantheon out of Parsantium or have monotheism replace polytheism at some point in Parsantium's past?
In my home campaign? I haven't decided yet – there are quite a few things I've changed in the course of writing the book.
Big Mac wrote:And will you make the single deity into the only god in the world that Parsantium is on (the "one true god") or have sailors that visit Parsantium from elsewhere have strange gods and strange cultures?
The latter, kind of. Because Parsantium is a blend of three major and one minor human cultures, there are four lots of gods with temples in the city: the Akhrani god, the Sampuran (Indian) pantheon, the Bathuran (Roman/Byzantine pantheon) and the Tiangaon (Chinese) pantheon. I could easily have gone with monotheism for the Bathurans too, and did, in fact, consider it, but I wanted to have a god of war, goddess of love etc.

This is actually a good topic for a blog post.... I'll try and write one in the next week or so ;)

Cheers


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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

Post by RichGreen »

Hi,

I've posted to the Parsantium blog about how I plan to make the book compatible with all editions of D&D. Should work just fine with 2e for those wanting to add the city to an AQ campaign ;)

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Hi,

I've just posted a brief update to the blog here and there's a poll on what I call Parsantium's dragon-like humanoids here.

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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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The final draft is finished ;) Blog post here.

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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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RichGreen wrote:Thanks for all the questions!
Thanks for all the answers. :)
RichGreen wrote:
Big Mac wrote:Have you moved from an Akhrani pantheon (in your old homebrew) to a single Akhrani deity in your new sourcebook?
Yes, I have – here's the first draft of Amur, the Sky God. Let me know what you think!

Amur, the Sky God
LG god of the Akhrani
Symbol: cloud
High Priest: Imam Efrat (see page XX)
Temples: Golden Mosque
Unlike the other human cultures in Parsantium, the Akhrani people worship only one god – Amur, the sky god who brings the life-giving rains and floods needed to grow crops in the hot desert climate of the Caliphate. Amur is a benevolent god, promising his worshippers an afterlife in the Seven Heavens if they follow his creed. This consists of six tenets – honouring Amur, hard work, alms-giving, prayer, self-denial and pilgrimage.

Followers of Amur must worship Amur, and Amur alone, as the One God. Energetic and honest farmers, merchants and craftsmen alike share a commitment to work hard , believing this will result in prosperity. It is also the duty of everyone to help those less fortunate than themselves, giving a proportion of their monthly income to those who need it most. Those who have little or no money are expected to do good deeds for others to fulfil this obligation.

Throughout the Old Quarter, the cries of the muezzin can be heard calling Amurites to prayer from the minarets of the mosques at dawn, noon, dusk and an hour before midnight. Worshippers should wash beforehand, using a small bowl of water, and prostrate themselves on the ground, facing in the direction of Qadisa, capital of the Caliphate of Akhran. During the month of Aprilis, Amurites will give up luxuries, including wine, coffee and meat and instead focus on prayer and repentance. Finally, every able-bodied worshipper of the god is expected to make a pilgrimage at least once in their life to the Grand Mosque in Qadisa.

There are no representations of Amur in his mosques –Amurites believe that since no mortal could possibly do justice to his divine form in a painting or sculpture, it would be blasphemous to try. Amur’s priests, known as imams, can be men or women, and are usually human, although there are few half-orc imams in Parsantium. They wear sky blue djellabas and gold holy symbols; the men have turbans while the women cover their heads with a blue scarf. Imams perform charitable deeds and also school local children who come to the mosques for religious and other teaching.
I think you have the best of both worlds here. You have a single deity for the entire city (and maybe the entire nation if you have a nation beyond the city) and yet you have kept the ability to have other religions (from elsewhere) clash with worshippers of your Parsantium faith.
RichGreen wrote:
Big Mac wrote:Do you have a link for the Scott Lynch interview (where he explains his own reasons for the switch)?
Saladin Ahmed is the writer, Scott Lynch is the interviewer in this instance. It's in the Crescent Moons sampler which you can download for free.
Thanks for that. I'll cross-post that link into the Crescent Moon Kingdoms mini-guide thread.
RichGreen wrote:
Big Mac wrote:Do you think you will retcon the pantheon out of Parsantium or have monotheism replace polytheism at some point in Parsantium's past?
In my home campaign? I haven't decided yet – there are quite a few things I've changed in the course of writing the book.
I remember once reading something written by someone that believed in some sort of evolution of religions. They claimed that people started off with abstract faiths where they have rituals around stuff like rain, wind, lions or other parts of nature, then move on to having a number of gods that control those various aspects of nature and then finally advance to belief in a single god.

This was someone talking about the real-world, and they were obviously biased, as they had stamped their own value judgement on the various types of religions they were talking about, but I think that if you put that real-world judgement to one side, this sort of thing might well work as the in-character belief of sages in a mono-deity society. Maybe this isn't the way they would do things in Parsantium, but it might work for somewhere that only has a single god.

I know there was a time in Egypt, when there was an attempt to throw out the pantheon and replace it with a single deity. That was eventually rejected and the nation went back to having lots of deities. (So from their real-world point-of-view, a pantheon was the optimal way to run religion.)

Anyhoo, the reason that I ask is that it would be possible to start (in the past) with an entire set of gods and have worshipers Amur slowly push out worship of other gods until only he is left. Even if you didn't have an entire pantheon (with lots of gods) you could still start off with four elemental gods and have a fire god, water god and earth god that go into decline (or maybe remain as illegal cults).

I'm not saying you should do this, but I see it as a possible way to go. A way that might allow you to include a set of three CG, LE and CE "lost gods" (or more gods).

That was kind of what I was asking about. Would you still include your original panthon in the history, or would you remove it entirely? (Or would you move it to another part of the world?)
RichGreen wrote:
Big Mac wrote:And will you make the single deity into the only god in the world that Parsantium is on (the "one true god") or have sailors that visit Parsantium from elsewhere have strange gods and strange cultures?
The latter, kind of. Because Parsantium is a blend of three major and one minor human cultures, there are four lots of gods with temples in the city: the Akhrani god, the Sampuran (Indian) pantheon, the Bathuran (Roman/Byzantine pantheon) and the Tiangaon (Chinese) pantheon. I could easily have gone with monotheism for the Bathurans too, and did, in fact, consider it, but I wanted to have a god of war, goddess of love etc.

This is actually a good topic for a blog post.... I'll try and write one in the next week or so ;)
I'll look forward to it. :)
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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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RichGreen wrote:I've posted to the Parsantium blog about how I plan to make the book compatible with all editions of D&D. Should work just fine with 2e for those wanting to add the city to an AQ campaign ;)
How well do you think Parsantium might work for anyone wanting to run a SJ campaign that has spacefarers from Zakhara, leaving Realmspace and visiting other Arabian-like worlds. :)
RichGreen wrote:I've just posted a brief update to the blog here and there's a poll on what I call Parsantium's dragon-like humanoids here.
I didn't see "Barneyfolk" in the poll. :P
RichGreen wrote:The final draft is finished ;) Blog post here.
Excellent! Are you going with Lulu, CreateSpace or DriveThru RPG's Print on Demand service? (Or are you going to start off with PDFs to give yourself time to hunt for bigs to fix?)
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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

Post by RichGreen »

Hi Dave,
Big Mac wrote: I think you have the best of both worlds here. You have a single deity for the entire city (and maybe the entire nation if you have a nation beyond the city) and yet you have kept the ability to have other religions (from elsewhere) clash with worshippers of your Parsantium faith.
It's not quite like that - will explain more in the religion post when I write it, but there are four main cultures in the city, each with their own religion. The Bathurans (Western conquerors 1,000 years ago) have their own pantheon with the sun god Helion at its head, the Sampurans (original Indian-like founders of the city) have a pantheon (including Indra, Vishnu, Kali et al), the Chinese-like Tiangaon have a pantheon, and the Arabian-like Aqhrani have one god, Amur. All are worshipped with Helion as the official god of the city (and the Basileus), but Vishnu and Amur both have a very large number of followers.
Big Mac wrote: I remember once reading something written by someone that believed in some sort of evolution of religions. They claimed that people started off with abstract faiths where they have rituals around stuff like rain, wind, lions or other parts of nature, then move on to having a number of gods that control those various aspects of nature and then finally advance to belief in a single god.

This was someone talking about the real-world, and they were obviously biased, as they had stamped their own value judgement on the various types of religions they were talking about, but I think that if you put that real-world judgement to one side, this sort of thing might well work as the in-character belief of sages in a mono-deity society. Maybe this isn't the way they would do things in Parsantium, but it might work for somewhere that only has a single god.

I know there was a time in Egypt, when there was an attempt to throw out the pantheon and replace it with a single deity. That was eventually rejected and the nation went back to having lots of deities. (So from their real-world point-of-view, a pantheon was the optimal way to run religion.)

Anyhoo, the reason that I ask is that it would be possible to start (in the past) with an entire set of gods and have worshipers Amur slowly push out worship of other gods until only he is left. Even if you didn't have an entire pantheon (with lots of gods) you could still start off with four elemental gods and have a fire god, water god and earth god that go into decline (or maybe remain as illegal cults).

I'm not saying you should do this, but I see it as a possible way to go. A way that might allow you to include a set of three CG, LE and CE "lost gods" (or more gods).

That was kind of what I was asking about. Would you still include your original panthon in the history, or would you remove it entirely? (Or would you move it to another part of the world?)
Interesting idea. The book is finished now (I had to stop at some point!) but it's certainly possible that Amur once belonged to a larger pantheon in the distant past. Maybe something I'll look at in any future supplements ;) There are a LOT of gods in the book though.

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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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Big Mac wrote: How well do you think Parsantium might work for anyone wanting to run a SJ campaign that has spacefarers from Zakhara, leaving Realmspace and visiting other Arabian-like worlds. :)
There are no spelljamming references in the book, but it would work as well with SJ as any campaign setting. I can certainly see Realms-like portals linking Parsantium with other cities. There is one in the book that links one part of the city with another via a tavern that exists in two places at once ;)
Big Mac wrote: Are you going with Lulu, CreateSpace or DriveThru RPG's Print on Demand service? (Or are you going to start off with PDFs to give yourself time to hunt for bigs to fix?)
PDF first, but there will be a print on demand option, just not sure with who. I want my own hard copy and Orc's Nest in Earlham St have very kindly agreed to stock it for me ;)

Cheers


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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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RichGreen wrote:
Big Mac wrote:I think you have the best of both worlds here. You have a single deity for the entire city (and maybe the entire nation if you have a nation beyond the city) and yet you have kept the ability to have other religions (from elsewhere) clash with worshippers of your Parsantium faith.
It's not quite like that - will explain more in the religion post when I write it, but there are four main cultures in the city, each with their own religion. The Bathurans (Western conquerors 1,000 years ago) have their own pantheon with the sun god Helion at its head, the Sampurans (original Indian-like founders of the city) have a pantheon (including Indra, Vishnu, Kali et al), the Chinese-like Tiangaon have a pantheon, and the Arabian-like Aqhrani have one god, Amur. All are worshipped with Helion as the official god of the city (and the Basileus), but Vishnu and Amur both have a very large number of followers.
OK. Thanks. I'll look forward to finding out more with the religion post at the blog.
RichGreen wrote:<snip - "evolution of religion from pantheon to just Amur>

Interesting idea. The book is finished now (I had to stop at some point!) but it's certainly possible that Amur once belonged to a larger pantheon in the distant past. Maybe something I'll look at in any future supplements ;) There are a LOT of gods in the book though.
I didn't realise that before. :)
RichGreen wrote:
Big Mac wrote:How well do you think Parsantium might work for anyone wanting to run a SJ campaign that has spacefarers from Zakhara, leaving Realmspace and visiting other Arabian-like worlds. :)
There are no spelljamming references in the book, but it would work as well with SJ as any campaign setting. I can certainly see Realms-like portals linking Parsantium with other cities. There is one in the book that links one part of the city with another via a tavern that exists in two places at once ;)
Have you designed the basics of the rest of the world? Or do you just have the two continents that Parsantium bridges?

It seems to me that Parsantium is on a long trade-route from the west to the east. Are your Sampurans and Tiangaon people traders from the east and far east?
RichGreen wrote:
Big Mac wrote: Are you going with Lulu, CreateSpace or DriveThru RPG's Print on Demand service? (Or are you going to start off with PDFs to give yourself time to hunt for bigs to fix?)
PDF first, but there will be a print on demand option, just not sure with who. I want my own hard copy and Orc's Nest in Earlham St have very kindly agreed to stock it for me ;)
Orc's Nest are good people.

You might also want to talk to Leisure Games in Finchley.
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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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Big Mac wrote: Have you designed the basics of the rest of the world? Or do you just have the two continents that Parsantium bridges?

It seems to me that Parsantium is on a long trade-route from the west to the east. Are your Sampurans and Tiangaon people traders from the east and far east?
It's across five trade routes. To the east, at the end of the Silk Road, is the exotic land of Tiangao; to the south east, beyond the Pillars of Heaven Mountains, are the Kingdoms of Sampur; across the sea to the south west lies the wealthy Caliphate of Aqhran, to the west are the Sunset Lands and the feuding city states of the former Bathuran Empire, and the Griffin Water to the north east is the quickest route to the frozen but beautiful land of Urskovia.

I haven't designed these distant lands in any detail so it's easy for a GM to change them to fit his or her campaign – so Zakhara could be the Caliphate of Aqhran, Kara-Tur could be Tiangao etc – but all of them have influenced Parsantium's history and culture.
Big Mac wrote:
You might also want to talk to Leisure Games in Finchley.
Good point - that's a great shop too.

Cheers


Rich

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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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Hi,

There's a brief update on the blog.

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Rich

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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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The sketch of the cover for Parsantium looks pretty good.

I think the guy at the back, holding up a sword, might actually be a gigantic statue on the island that the bridge leads up to.

EDIT: It is called "the Colossus". Must be inspired by the Colossus of Rhodes.
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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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Big Mac wrote:The sketch of the cover for Parsantium looks pretty good.

I think the guy at the back, holding up a sword, might actually be a gigantic statue on the island that the bridge leads up to.

EDIT: It is called "the Colossus". Must be inspired by the Colossus of Rhodes.
Yes, that's right. Here's a sneak preview of the entry on the Colossus from the book:

Towering over the markets, the Colossus is a 200 foot tall bronze statue depicting the hawk-nosed conqueror, Corandias the Magnificent. The first Basileus of Parsantium is shown with a victor’s laurel wreath on his head, wearing a suit of scale armour, and holding a long sword aloft in triumph in his right hand. Built in 696 as part of Corandias’ extensive public works programme, the mammoth project was overseen by the (ironically Aqhrani) master sculptor Rafiqi Al-Ru’izz and the Basileus’ vizier, Marcus Servius (the powerful wizard who founded the Esoteric Order of the Blue Lotus) and took two years to complete. The monumental statue is often used as a meeting point by locals in the Mercantile Quarter; someone might say “Let’s meet by the right foot at sunset” to his friend.

The Colossus is supposedly a golem of great power which will animate and defend the city in times of dire need. No one knows if this is true, although it is said that the statues eyes lit up with a reddish glow when Kalgroth Ironheart’s hobgoblin army took Parsantium. There have been no other reports of the Colossus coming to life or moving in any way, although the fact that its bronze surface still shines brightly after 850 years indicates some kind of magic is in effect. Those who examine the bronze surface of the Colossus in detail – only possible by climbing the great marble plinth it stands on – can spot what appear to be strange symbols among the patterns decorating the statue’s footwear.


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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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RichGreen wrote:Towering over the markets, the Colossus is a 200 foot tall bronze statue depicting the hawk-nosed conqueror, Corandias the Magnificent. The first Basileus of Parsantium is shown with a victor’s laurel wreath on his head, wearing a suit of scale armour, and holding a long sword aloft in triumph in his right hand. Built in 696 as part of Corandias’ extensive public works programme, the mammoth project was overseen by the (ironically Aqhrani) master sculptor Rafiqi Al-Ru’izz and the Basileus’ vizier, Marcus Servius (the powerful wizard who founded the Esoteric Order of the Blue Lotus) and took two years to complete. The monumental statue is often used as a meeting point by locals in the Mercantile Quarter; someone might say “Let’s meet by the right foot at sunset” to his friend.
Thanks for the preview.

That is much bigger than the Colossus of Rhodes (and also higher than the Statue of Liberty). But then you do have magic to help the construction.
RichGreen wrote:The Colossus is supposedly a golem of great power which will animate and defend the city in times of dire need. No one knows if this is true, although it is said that the statues eyes lit up with a reddish glow when Kalgroth Ironheart’s hobgoblin army took Parsantium. There have been no other reports of the Colossus coming to life or moving in any way, although the fact that its bronze surface still shines brightly after 850 years indicates some kind of magic is in effect. Those who examine the bronze surface of the Colossus in detail – only possible by climbing the great marble plinth it stands on – can spot what appear to be strange symbols among the patterns decorating the statue’s footwear.
Does the Colossus stand astride the route leading up to the bridge? If the statue is 200 foot tall, the feet must be spread out quite a lot and that marble plinth must be very wide. I assume it must be fairly tall to be a "great marble plinth". Is there some sort of a gap in the plinth (like a tunnel for people - perhaps with doors at each end - to walk through, as part of the main route through Parsantium)?

Or is the entire statue placed off to one side of the main route?

The Colossus of Rhodes was filled with stone blocks, while the State of Liberty is open inside (and even has stairs leading up to a viewing gallery). I can see the Colossus of Parsantium being like either of those (although I doubt it would be used as a tourist attraction if there was a way to get up inside it).

I bet you could have an adventure (or an adventure hook) where a group of PCs investigates rumours that there is a way to get into the plinth and up inside the statue.
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Re: Parsantium (a homebrew Arabian city)

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Big Mac wrote: Does the Colossus stand astride the route leading up to the bridge? If the statue is 200 foot tall, the feet must be spread out quite a lot and that marble plinth must be very wide. I assume it must be fairly tall to be a "great marble plinth". Is there some sort of a gap in the plinth (like a tunnel for people - perhaps with doors at each end - to walk through, as part of the main route through Parsantium)?

Or is the entire statue placed off to one side of the main route?

The Colossus of Rhodes was filled with stone blocks, while the State of Liberty is open inside (and even has stairs leading up to a viewing gallery). I can see the Colossus of Parsantium being like either of those (although I doubt it would be used as a tourist attraction if there was a way to get up inside it).

I bet you could have an adventure (or an adventure hook) where a group of PCs investigates rumours that there is a way to get into the plinth and up inside the statue.
The Colossus is in the middle of the central island in a large marketplace (see the map here) so there is no archway through the plinth. It is surrounded by market stalls on all sides.

I like the idea that the PCs might try and get inside though....

Cheers


Rich

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